The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Use of domestic waste glass for urban paving : Malisch, WR ; Day, DE ; Wixson, BG summary report

By: Malisch, Ward RContributor(s): Day, Delbert E | Wixson, Bobby GPublication details: Cincinatti, OH : National Environmental Research Center, 1975 Description: 60 sSubject(s): Glass | Waste product | Aggregate | Bituminous mixture | Pavement | Skidding resistance | Cost | Characteristics | Water | USA | Sensitivity | 56Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: This report summarizes research on the use of waste glass as an aggregate in asphaltic paving mixtures. Reusing waste glass in this manner would provide an outlet for large quantities of the glass and would permit recycling in urban areas where large accumulations of glass are found. Field tests as well as observations of pavement performance have indicated that field installations of asphaltic paving mixtures containing glass have generally maintained adequate skid resistance and performed acceptably from a structural standpoint. The economic feasibility of using waste glass as an aggregate in asphaltic concrete depends primarily on developing resource recovery systems that can separate glass along with other recyclable components and generate enough revenues from their sale, plus disposal and processing fees, to produce an acceptable return on equity.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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This report summarizes research on the use of waste glass as an aggregate in asphaltic paving mixtures. Reusing waste glass in this manner would provide an outlet for large quantities of the glass and would permit recycling in urban areas where large accumulations of glass are found. Field tests as well as observations of pavement performance have indicated that field installations of asphaltic paving mixtures containing glass have generally maintained adequate skid resistance and performed acceptably from a structural standpoint. The economic feasibility of using waste glass as an aggregate in asphaltic concrete depends primarily on developing resource recovery systems that can separate glass along with other recyclable components and generate enough revenues from their sale, plus disposal and processing fees, to produce an acceptable return on equity.

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