The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Speed behaviour and drivers' attitude to speeding Fildes, BN ; Rumbold, G ; Leening, A

By: Contributor(s): Publication details: Clayton Monash University, 1991; Accident Research Centre. Report 16, Description: 69 s. + bilISBN:
  • 0732600170
Subject(s): Online resources: Bibl.nr: VTI P5845:16Location: Abstract: Four studies were undertaken at rural and urban road sites aimed at relating motorists' attitudes to speed with their actual on-road speed behaviour. Those travelling at excessively fast and slow travel speeds were of particular interest. Drivers' speeds were measured at each site and target vehicles were stopped at a set of traffic lights further along the road and asked to participate in a general road safety survey. Those who agreed pulled off into an off-road parking area and were questioned about a number of driver, vehicle, trip purpose, speed attitude, and accident history factors. Significant travel speed relationships were found at all sites for driver age, number of occupants, purpose of the trip, intended speed, safe speed, accident involvement and the total number of accidents. In addition, vehicle type, age, and whether the vehicle was towing or not was related to travel speed in rural areas, while amount of weekly travel was associated with travel speed in urban areas. A surprisingly high number of motorists at all speed levels did not believe it to be dangerous to travel 30 km/h above the posted speed limits and most thought the chance of being stopped by the police for speeding at these sites to be low. Multivariate analysis was also undertaken to examine the relative importance of (and important interactions between) the variables. While these findings provided some additional useful and novel information, care needs to be taken with these results because of the relatively small amount of variance explained and hence, predictive power (other factors and interactions are clearly important for a drivers' speed decision on the road). The findings of the study point to a number of potential countermeasures against speeding and some additional research required in this area.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings: VTI P5845:16

Four studies were undertaken at rural and urban road sites aimed at relating motorists' attitudes to speed with their actual on-road speed behaviour. Those travelling at excessively fast and slow travel speeds were of particular interest. Drivers' speeds were measured at each site and target vehicles were stopped at a set of traffic lights further along the road and asked to participate in a general road safety survey. Those who agreed pulled off into an off-road parking area and were questioned about a number of driver, vehicle, trip purpose, speed attitude, and accident history factors. Significant travel speed relationships were found at all sites for driver age, number of occupants, purpose of the trip, intended speed, safe speed, accident involvement and the total number of accidents. In addition, vehicle type, age, and whether the vehicle was towing or not was related to travel speed in rural areas, while amount of weekly travel was associated with travel speed in urban areas. A surprisingly high number of motorists at all speed levels did not believe it to be dangerous to travel 30 km/h above the posted speed limits and most thought the chance of being stopped by the police for speeding at these sites to be low. Multivariate analysis was also undertaken to examine the relative importance of (and important interactions between) the variables. While these findings provided some additional useful and novel information, care needs to be taken with these results because of the relatively small amount of variance explained and hence, predictive power (other factors and interactions are clearly important for a drivers' speed decision on the road). The findings of the study point to a number of potential countermeasures against speeding and some additional research required in this area.

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