The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

The effects of lower urban speed limits on mobility, accessibility, energy and the environment : Trade-offs with increased safety? Taylor, Michael AP

By: Taylor, Michael APPublication details: Canberra Federal Office of Road Safety, 1997; University of South Australia, Description: 1 CD, 142 s. CDSubject(s): Australia | Speed limit | | Impact study | | Accessibility | Journey time | Simulation | | Delay | Fuel consumption | Emission | | Traffic control | Coordinated signals | 11 | 15 | 25Bibl.nr: VTI 2002.0734:1 VTI 2005.0003Location: Abstract: This report describes the application of a computer-based traffic network model to a set of synthetic test networks, to examine the effects of lower speed limits on traffic progression, travel times, speeds and delays, fuel consumption and emissions under different traffic control strategies and levels of traffic congestion. It suggests that although travel times increase with lower speed limits, the increases are proportionately less than those indicated by the differences between speed limits. Further there are indications that intelligent traffic signal coordination systems may further ameliorate such increases.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut

VTI:s bibliotek i Linköping
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Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut

VTI:s bibliotek i Linköping
bibliotek@vti.se

Available

This report describes the application of a computer-based traffic network model to a set of synthetic test networks, to examine the effects of lower speed limits on traffic progression, travel times, speeds and delays, fuel consumption and emissions under different traffic control strategies and levels of traffic congestion. It suggests that although travel times increase with lower speed limits, the increases are proportionately less than those indicated by the differences between speed limits. Further there are indications that intelligent traffic signal coordination systems may further ameliorate such increases.

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