The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Safety of pedestrians and cyclists in urban areas

By: European Transport Safety Council, ETSCPublication details: Bryssel European Transport Safety Council, ETSC, 1999Description: 47 sSubject(s): Safety | Pedestrian | Cyclist | Urban area | Belgium | 812 | 82Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: In 1996 more than 9,400 pedestrians and cyclists were killed in EU countries as a consequence of road crashes, contributing 22 per cent of all road deaths. The risk of being killed in traffic per kilometre travelled is more than four times higher for these two groups than for car occupants. The severity of injuries is higher than for car occupants. The average severity is generally higher in rural areas, but the great majority of casualties to pedestrians and cyclists occur in urban areas. On average in EU countries, pedestrian and cycle crash risks are higher for children, young people and elderly road users. In particular, the risk of death in traffic for pedestrians aged 65 and older is four times higher than for young adults. The overall long term trend in deaths has been downward for both pedestrians and cyclists, but this may be due in some instances to a decline in walking and cycling as more people take to their cars for local journeys. However, this trend may be influenced in future by the encouragement now being given in several Member States to travel by foot, bicycle or public transport. For example, the Danish National Traffic Plan states that 4 per cent of total car traffic should be converted into cycling and walking by the year 2005 and one-third of all car traffic under 3 km into non-motorised travel. As travel by public transport is also encouraged, increasing account needs to be taken of the safety of walking or cycling to catch the bus, tram or train. Walking and cycling have much greater risk levels per hour than travel in public transport vehicles. It should therefore be a high priority for those responsible for traffic systems in our urban areas to cater much better for the needs and physical vulnerabilities of pedestrians and cyclists, including people with reduced mobility. There are many ways in which the EU can help them to do so.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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In 1996 more than 9,400 pedestrians and cyclists were killed in EU countries as a consequence of road crashes, contributing 22 per cent of all road deaths. The risk of being killed in traffic per kilometre travelled is more than four times higher for these two groups than for car occupants. The severity of injuries is higher than for car occupants. The average severity is generally higher in rural areas, but the great majority of casualties to pedestrians and cyclists occur in urban areas. On average in EU countries, pedestrian and cycle crash risks are higher for children, young people and elderly road users. In particular, the risk of death in traffic for pedestrians aged 65 and older is four times higher than for young adults. The overall long term trend in deaths has been downward for both pedestrians and cyclists, but this may be due in some instances to a decline in walking and cycling as more people take to their cars for local journeys. However, this trend may be influenced in future by the encouragement now being given in several Member States to travel by foot, bicycle or public transport. For example, the Danish National Traffic Plan states that 4 per cent of total car traffic should be converted into cycling and walking by the year 2005 and one-third of all car traffic under 3 km into non-motorised travel. As travel by public transport is also encouraged, increasing account needs to be taken of the safety of walking or cycling to catch the bus, tram or train. Walking and cycling have much greater risk levels per hour than travel in public transport vehicles. It should therefore be a high priority for those responsible for traffic systems in our urban areas to cater much better for the needs and physical vulnerabilities of pedestrians and cyclists, including people with reduced mobility. There are many ways in which the EU can help them to do so.

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