The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

In-line skating injury : A review of the literature Sherker, Shauna ; Cassell, Erin

By: Sherker, ShaunaContributor(s): Cassell, ErinPublication details: Clayton Monash University, 1998; Accident Research Centre. Report 133, Description: 41 s. + bilISBN: 0732614317Subject(s): Inline skater | Accident | Injury | Characteristics | Cause | Australia | 113Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: The aim of this report is to critically review both formal research literature and informal sources of information that describe preventive strategies and countermeasures to in-line skating injury. The increase in popularity of in-line skating has led to a concomitant increase in skating injuries. Most of the injuries occur in older children (aged 10-14 years). In-line skating injuries contribute 1.4% of injuries presenting to hospital emergency departments for this age group of children in Victoria. Hospital admission rates in Australia for in-line skating injuries range from 15%-28% of hospital emergency department presentations, reflecting their serious nature. Falls cause more than three-quarters of these injuries. The most typical fall involves young novice or beginner skaters wearing little or no safety gear, who either spontaneously lose their balance while skating outdoors or fall after striking a road defect or some debris. The fall usually occurs on an outstretched arm onto a hard surface, with the wrist sustaining the injury. The main risk factors for injury are the speed at which skaters travel, obstacles in pathways, and hard landing surfaces.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The aim of this report is to critically review both formal research literature and informal sources of information that describe preventive strategies and countermeasures to in-line skating injury. The increase in popularity of in-line skating has led to a concomitant increase in skating injuries. Most of the injuries occur in older children (aged 10-14 years). In-line skating injuries contribute 1.4% of injuries presenting to hospital emergency departments for this age group of children in Victoria. Hospital admission rates in Australia for in-line skating injuries range from 15%-28% of hospital emergency department presentations, reflecting their serious nature. Falls cause more than three-quarters of these injuries. The most typical fall involves young novice or beginner skaters wearing little or no safety gear, who either spontaneously lose their balance while skating outdoors or fall after striking a road defect or some debris. The fall usually occurs on an outstretched arm onto a hard surface, with the wrist sustaining the injury. The main risk factors for injury are the speed at which skaters travel, obstacles in pathways, and hard landing surfaces.

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