The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Dotdotcom : Information technology to enable innovative finance Slack, Teresa et al

By: Slack, TeresaPublication details: Transportation Research Board, 2001; Conference proceedings 24, Description: nr 24, s. 54-58Subject(s): USA | Conference | Toll collection | Automatic vehicle identification | Financing | Marketing | Economic efficiency | | 02 | 23Bibl.nr: VTI P9000:24Location: Abstract: Electronic toll collection, long anticipated to be the great enabling technology for toll facilities, has come into its own. Florida's Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority is managing approximately 150,000 transponder accounts, with electronic (as opposed to cash) toll collections accounting for about 50% of transactions during peak travel hours. In the 12 years since introduction of electronic toll collection on this system, revenues have increased almost threefold, and much of that growth is attributable to the efficiencies inherent in electronic toll collection. One of the implications of increased use of electronic toll collection and automated vehicle identification more generally is the possibility of archiving travel data and marketing the data to public agencies or private corporations that have an interest in more and better knowledge of travel and traffic patterns. Although the dissemination and sale of archived data raises important privacy considerations, it also presents near-term opportunities for improving planning processes and creating new revenue streams. In a similar vein, a growing number of jurisdictions are joining with private corporations to apply vehicle identification technologies to traffic enforcement. The revenue potential afforded by automated traffic enforcement appeals to many, but this benefit pales in comparison with the potential for such technologies to reduce the terrible toll that traffic violations exact in deaths and injuries every year.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Electronic toll collection, long anticipated to be the great enabling technology for toll facilities, has come into its own. Florida's Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority is managing approximately 150,000 transponder accounts, with electronic (as opposed to cash) toll collections accounting for about 50% of transactions during peak travel hours. In the 12 years since introduction of electronic toll collection on this system, revenues have increased almost threefold, and much of that growth is attributable to the efficiencies inherent in electronic toll collection. One of the implications of increased use of electronic toll collection and automated vehicle identification more generally is the possibility of archiving travel data and marketing the data to public agencies or private corporations that have an interest in more and better knowledge of travel and traffic patterns. Although the dissemination and sale of archived data raises important privacy considerations, it also presents near-term opportunities for improving planning processes and creating new revenue streams. In a similar vein, a growing number of jurisdictions are joining with private corporations to apply vehicle identification technologies to traffic enforcement. The revenue potential afforded by automated traffic enforcement appeals to many, but this benefit pales in comparison with the potential for such technologies to reduce the terrible toll that traffic violations exact in deaths and injuries every year.

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