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Are we there yet? A state-of-the-practice review of transportation finance Probst, Robert et al

By: Probst, RobertPublication details: Transportation Research Board, 2001; Conference proceedings 24, Description: nr 24, s. 17-24Subject(s): USA | Conference | Financing | Transport network | Partnership | J12 | 02Bibl.nr: VTI P9000:24Location: Abstract: R. Probst of the South Carolina Department of Transportation uses his state's so-called 27&7 program to exemplify how a state can capitalize on many of the legislative and programmatic advances of the past 3 years to substantially accelerate the delivery of billions of dollars worth of transportation infrastructure. R. Farris of the Interwest Companies notes that the backbone of the nation's approach to financing transportation improvements remains per-gallon federal and state fuel taxes; however, the fact that there is no longer any reasonable relationship between fuel consumption and the vehicle miles traveled suggests a need to examine new ways to price transportation. C. Russell of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey points out the hallmarks of the authority's model for public works finance: a dedicated revenue stream, pooled revenues from port-owned facilities, a long-standing reliance on public-private partnerships, and rigorous standards for the ratio between available revenues and debt service requirements. F. Ballard of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll provides an overview of the role played by bond counsel in the financing of large transportation projects.
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R. Probst of the South Carolina Department of Transportation uses his state's so-called 27&7 program to exemplify how a state can capitalize on many of the legislative and programmatic advances of the past 3 years to substantially accelerate the delivery of billions of dollars worth of transportation infrastructure. R. Farris of the Interwest Companies notes that the backbone of the nation's approach to financing transportation improvements remains per-gallon federal and state fuel taxes; however, the fact that there is no longer any reasonable relationship between fuel consumption and the vehicle miles traveled suggests a need to examine new ways to price transportation. C. Russell of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey points out the hallmarks of the authority's model for public works finance: a dedicated revenue stream, pooled revenues from port-owned facilities, a long-standing reliance on public-private partnerships, and rigorous standards for the ratio between available revenues and debt service requirements. F. Ballard of Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll provides an overview of the role played by bond counsel in the financing of large transportation projects.

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