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Symposium summary High, Jeffrey ; Bontadelli, Peter ; Wakeman, Thomas

By: High, JeffreyContributor(s): Bontadelli, Peter | Wakeman, ThomasPublication details: Transportation Research Board. Conference proceedings 22, 2000Description: nr 22, s. 103-6Subject(s): USA | Conference | Ship | Transport | Risk | Management | Decision process | PrcBibl.nr: VTI P9000:22Location: Abstract: Jeffrey High summarizes the symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from his point of view as Director of Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard. His remarks briefly address the context in which this information will be used for the marine transportation system initiative. Peter Bontadelli summarizes the symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from the point of view of a consultant. Group one emphasized that we need to pull out the information on methods and methodologies, and we need to find a recommendation on how to accomplish that. The second group was very clear on two points--not only the near-miss reporting, which is a great first step, but the fact that there are a lot of excellent data out there. The fact that there are qualitative as well as quantitative data is a critical issue. Group three made clear that all decision making has to be done in the real-world context. The fourth group talked about the federal agencies' roles. These are the people who get stuck figuring out how to integrate and use data in risk management. Thomas Wakeman summarizes what he heard from this 2-day symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from the point of view of a manager. The foremost recommendation was that we need to have a more standardized process for the maritime industry. This was a strong theme from the first group's comments. From the second group's discussion of data needs, the one thing that reverberated again and again was that we need to go ahead and get an incident reporting system in place, and it needs to have liability protection. The third group illustrated that risk management is all about tradeoffs in the real world. The fourth group's synthesis was that we need an entity that is responsible and accountable for gathering all the data and making them available widely to all the decision makers. The Coast Guard was mentioned as a possible agent.
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Jeffrey High summarizes the symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from his point of view as Director of Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard. His remarks briefly address the context in which this information will be used for the marine transportation system initiative. Peter Bontadelli summarizes the symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from the point of view of a consultant. Group one emphasized that we need to pull out the information on methods and methodologies, and we need to find a recommendation on how to accomplish that. The second group was very clear on two points--not only the near-miss reporting, which is a great first step, but the fact that there are a lot of excellent data out there. The fact that there are qualitative as well as quantitative data is a critical issue. Group three made clear that all decision making has to be done in the real-world context. The fourth group talked about the federal agencies' roles. These are the people who get stuck figuring out how to integrate and use data in risk management. Thomas Wakeman summarizes what he heard from this 2-day symposium on risk management in the marine transportation system from the point of view of a manager. The foremost recommendation was that we need to have a more standardized process for the maritime industry. This was a strong theme from the first group's comments. From the second group's discussion of data needs, the one thing that reverberated again and again was that we need to go ahead and get an incident reporting system in place, and it needs to have liability protection. The third group illustrated that risk management is all about tradeoffs in the real world. The fourth group's synthesis was that we need an entity that is responsible and accountable for gathering all the data and making them available widely to all the decision makers. The Coast Guard was mentioned as a possible agent.

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