The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Oceans risk and criteria analysis Bushell, George

By: Bushell, GeorgePublication details: Transportation Research Board. Conference proceedings 22, 2000Description: nr 22, s. 73-82Subject(s): USA | Conference | Ship | Transport | Risk | | Canada | Allocation | Decision process | Data processing | PrcBibl.nr: VTI P9000:22Location: Abstract: Given scarce resources and a continuing emphasis on a business approach, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) is striving to better allocate resources among waterways, programs, and users in order to achieve the best possible level of marine safety. In this regard, the CCG has used, and is continuing to use, risk analysis and risk management tools on a project and program basis. However, to better match resources to risk (both geographically and by program) the CCG still would like an estimate of overall marine risk by program and waterway. The CCG and Consulting and Audit Canada (CAC) have conducted a number of traditional risk-based analyses on a project and program basis in the past. However, these types of studies are relatively expensive and take considerable time to complete. The next level of analysis involves creating an index from those factors or criteria that the marine community now uses, both explicitly and implicitly, to rank risk and to allocate resources across waterways and by program. CAC created a display and risk index computer system with about 150 columns of risk-related data covering 100+ waterways/ports. The computer system, called ORCA (Oceans Risk and Criteria Analysis), allows a user to automatically display data in bar chart, map, or scattergram format and to weigh and combine criteria data in a risk index. Data can be modified to conduct "what if" analyses. Study area risk index values for a given safety program can be compared with study area expenditures or other activity measures for the program and potential anomalies can be identified. However, detailed analysis of any apparent anomalies is necessary before any resources can be reallocated. Furthermore, a minimum level of waterway service may be required for some programs regardless of the measured level of a program risk index. Finally, it should be noted that considerable resources must be dedicated to ensuring that risk criteria data are kept up-to-date and that costs are properly allocated to programs and waterways.
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Given scarce resources and a continuing emphasis on a business approach, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) is striving to better allocate resources among waterways, programs, and users in order to achieve the best possible level of marine safety. In this regard, the CCG has used, and is continuing to use, risk analysis and risk management tools on a project and program basis. However, to better match resources to risk (both geographically and by program) the CCG still would like an estimate of overall marine risk by program and waterway. The CCG and Consulting and Audit Canada (CAC) have conducted a number of traditional risk-based analyses on a project and program basis in the past. However, these types of studies are relatively expensive and take considerable time to complete. The next level of analysis involves creating an index from those factors or criteria that the marine community now uses, both explicitly and implicitly, to rank risk and to allocate resources across waterways and by program. CAC created a display and risk index computer system with about 150 columns of risk-related data covering 100+ waterways/ports. The computer system, called ORCA (Oceans Risk and Criteria Analysis), allows a user to automatically display data in bar chart, map, or scattergram format and to weigh and combine criteria data in a risk index. Data can be modified to conduct "what if" analyses. Study area risk index values for a given safety program can be compared with study area expenditures or other activity measures for the program and potential anomalies can be identified. However, detailed analysis of any apparent anomalies is necessary before any resources can be reallocated. Furthermore, a minimum level of waterway service may be required for some programs regardless of the measured level of a program risk index. Finally, it should be noted that considerable resources must be dedicated to ensuring that risk criteria data are kept up-to-date and that costs are properly allocated to programs and waterways.

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