The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Evaluations of walk and bike paths Gärling, Anita ; Berle, Björn ; Fritzell, Lena

By: Gärling, AnitaContributor(s): Berle, Björn | Fritzell, LenaPublication details: Lunds universitet. Tekniska högskolan, 2000; Teknik och samhälle. Trafikplanering, ; Bulletin, Description: nr 187:2, s. 543-52Subject(s): Sweden | Conference | Pedestrian | Cyclist | Footway | Cycle track | Planning | Road user | Method | Quality | Risk | Aesthetics | Layout | Perception | Questionnaire | 113Online resources: Publikation/Publication Bibl.nr: VTI P1494:187:2Location: Abstract: To achieve a sustainable society several propositions and programs have been presented in which the necessity to reduce automobile use has been. However, in recent years car use has increased. If shorter automobile trips could be substituted with bike and walk trips this should, at least, slow down the environmental deterioration. Theoretically there is a substantial potential in biking and walking. However, how to change automobile use into bike and walk is somewhat unclear and current bike and walk paths are obviously not used as desired. The aim of this study is to examine how those who plan/build bike and walk paths and those who use them evaluate current bike and walk paths. In doing this a heuristic evaluation method is used. The results show that users made more negative evaluations of paths, assessed quality of the paths' as lower, and were less good in identifying the different types of paths. Furthermore, the importance of exhibited information was unveiled.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings: VTI P1494:187:2

To achieve a sustainable society several propositions and programs have been presented in which the necessity to reduce automobile use has been. However, in recent years car use has increased. If shorter automobile trips could be substituted with bike and walk trips this should, at least, slow down the environmental deterioration. Theoretically there is a substantial potential in biking and walking. However, how to change automobile use into bike and walk is somewhat unclear and current bike and walk paths are obviously not used as desired. The aim of this study is to examine how those who plan/build bike and walk paths and those who use them evaluate current bike and walk paths. In doing this a heuristic evaluation method is used. The results show that users made more negative evaluations of paths, assessed quality of the paths' as lower, and were less good in identifying the different types of paths. Furthermore, the importance of exhibited information was unveiled.

Powered by Koha