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Effect of curing methods on durability of high-performance concrete Nassif, Hani ; Suksawang, Nakin

By: Nassif, HaniContributor(s): Suksawang, NakinPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2002Description: nr 1798, s. 31-8Subject(s): USA | High performance concrete | | Method | Variability | | Durability | Mix design | Chloride | Permeability | | Frost | Thaw | 52Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2002 RefLocation: Abstract: Many state departments of transportation are currently either using high-performance concrete (HPC) or developing new mix proportions for the application of HPC to transportation structures, with emphasis on bridge decks. However, many state engineers have observed that curing methods and conditions in the field affect the behavior of HPC structures. Moreover, little is known about the effect of curing on the long-term durability of HPC. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the behavior of HPC under various curing conditions and durations and the effect of pozzolanic material such as fly ash and silica fume on rapid chloride permeability (RCP). These factors were studied as part of a project for the New Jersey Department of Transportation to develop and implement mix design and technical specifications for HPC transportation structures such as pavements and bridges. Several mixes were tested, and the best mix was selected on the basis of strength and shrinkage test performance. The long-term durability was assessed by tests for RCP, creep, and freeze-thaw behavior. Moreover, the effect on HPC of four curing methods--moist curing, air-dry curing, burlap wrap, and curing compound--was investigated. Moist-cured cylinders performed better than those cured with other methods, and a minimum of 14 days of cure was required for HPC to attain its full strength.
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Many state departments of transportation are currently either using high-performance concrete (HPC) or developing new mix proportions for the application of HPC to transportation structures, with emphasis on bridge decks. However, many state engineers have observed that curing methods and conditions in the field affect the behavior of HPC structures. Moreover, little is known about the effect of curing on the long-term durability of HPC. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the behavior of HPC under various curing conditions and durations and the effect of pozzolanic material such as fly ash and silica fume on rapid chloride permeability (RCP). These factors were studied as part of a project for the New Jersey Department of Transportation to develop and implement mix design and technical specifications for HPC transportation structures such as pavements and bridges. Several mixes were tested, and the best mix was selected on the basis of strength and shrinkage test performance. The long-term durability was assessed by tests for RCP, creep, and freeze-thaw behavior. Moreover, the effect on HPC of four curing methods--moist curing, air-dry curing, burlap wrap, and curing compound--was investigated. Moist-cured cylinders performed better than those cured with other methods, and a minimum of 14 days of cure was required for HPC to attain its full strength.

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