The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Spatial dimensions of logistic strategies : A typology Burmeister, Antje

By: Burmeister, AntjePublication details: Transport systems: Organization and planning, 2000; 3rd KFB research conference, June 13-14, 2000. Paper, Description: 13 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Logistics | Location | Planning | Administration | Properties | Production | 12Online resources: Publikation/Publication Bibl.nr: VTI 2001.1209Location: Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of logistic strategies of firms and of their implications on the spatial organisation of production. The general belief is that flexible just-in-time production systems with complex logistic systems and intensive use of technologies of information and communication will replace the traditional Fordist mode of production. We will first show that the diffusion of JIT is incomplete, and that it is not correlated to accessibility in terms of transportation. We will then demonstrate the differentiation of logistic strategies. Logistic strategies are here understood as the strategies concerning the organisation of the circulation of goods and information between the production process and its environment of suppliers, customers, subcontractors and other partners. We will first develop a conceptual typology of modes of co-ordination of production. We will then attempt to extend this typology to the organisation of logistics and transportation. Our position is that typologies based merely on physical characteristics of products (weight, volume, technical constraints etc.), such as the classifications commonly used in transportation statistics, are insufficient for analysing the logistic constraints and strategies and their consequences on the spatial organisation of production and distribution. We thus attempt to include other criteria of differentiation, based on an analysis of the co-ordination of production with its environment of resources and demand. We will test the theoretical framework on a sample of 110 production plants in five industrial activities: food, textile and clothing, chemicals, metalworking, machinery. Detailed information on product and production characteristics, relations with customers, suppliers and subcontractors, on the procurement and delivery systems and inventories and on the use of transport systems has been collected through interviews and will be processed through statistical methods of data analysis (such as cluster analysis).
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings: VTI 2001.1209

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of logistic strategies of firms and of their implications on the spatial organisation of production. The general belief is that flexible just-in-time production systems with complex logistic systems and intensive use of technologies of information and communication will replace the traditional Fordist mode of production. We will first show that the diffusion of JIT is incomplete, and that it is not correlated to accessibility in terms of transportation. We will then demonstrate the differentiation of logistic strategies. Logistic strategies are here understood as the strategies concerning the organisation of the circulation of goods and information between the production process and its environment of suppliers, customers, subcontractors and other partners. We will first develop a conceptual typology of modes of co-ordination of production. We will then attempt to extend this typology to the organisation of logistics and transportation. Our position is that typologies based merely on physical characteristics of products (weight, volume, technical constraints etc.), such as the classifications commonly used in transportation statistics, are insufficient for analysing the logistic constraints and strategies and their consequences on the spatial organisation of production and distribution. We thus attempt to include other criteria of differentiation, based on an analysis of the co-ordination of production with its environment of resources and demand. We will test the theoretical framework on a sample of 110 production plants in five industrial activities: food, textile and clothing, chemicals, metalworking, machinery. Detailed information on product and production characteristics, relations with customers, suppliers and subcontractors, on the procurement and delivery systems and inventories and on the use of transport systems has been collected through interviews and will be processed through statistical methods of data analysis (such as cluster analysis).

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