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Feasibility of geosynthetic inclusion for reducing swelling of expansive soils Vessely, Mark J ; Wu, Jonathan TH

By: Vessely, Mark JContributor(s): Wu, Jonathan THPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2002Description: nr 1787, s. 42-52Subject(s): USA | | Soil | | Geotextile | Test | | Vertical | Lateral | Deformation | 62Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2002 RefLocation: Abstract: The feasibility of geosynthetic inclusion for reducing swelling of expansive soils was studied by performing laboratory soil-geosynthetic swell tests on an expansive soil. The test specimen measures 12 x 12 x 12 in., with a sheet of geosynthetic embedded horizontally at the midheight of the soil. To prepare the test specimen, the soil was first compacted, in 1-in. lifts, inside a wooden mold to the prescribed density and moisture content. The soil was then allowed to swell subject to wetting by soil suction. The vertical and lateral deformations of the specimen were monitored throughout the test. To assess the effect of geosynthetic inclusion, a test without geosynthetic inclusion was performed in otherwise identical conditions for comparison purposes. The test method and test results are described. On the basis of the test results, the feasibility of geosynthetic inclusion for reducing swelling of expansive soils in practical applications is addressed.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The feasibility of geosynthetic inclusion for reducing swelling of expansive soils was studied by performing laboratory soil-geosynthetic swell tests on an expansive soil. The test specimen measures 12 x 12 x 12 in., with a sheet of geosynthetic embedded horizontally at the midheight of the soil. To prepare the test specimen, the soil was first compacted, in 1-in. lifts, inside a wooden mold to the prescribed density and moisture content. The soil was then allowed to swell subject to wetting by soil suction. The vertical and lateral deformations of the specimen were monitored throughout the test. To assess the effect of geosynthetic inclusion, a test without geosynthetic inclusion was performed in otherwise identical conditions for comparison purposes. The test method and test results are described. On the basis of the test results, the feasibility of geosynthetic inclusion for reducing swelling of expansive soils in practical applications is addressed.

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