The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Drinking drivers : A cluster of risk-taking behaviors Sommers, MS et al

By: Sommers, MSPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 5 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Drunkenness | | Risk taking | Behaviour | Interview | Smoking | Offender | Drugs | Prevention | Recommendations | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of risk-taking behaviors among young-adult drinking drivers who were seriously injured in motor vehicle crashes. The data for this study were collected as part of a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of brief interventions to decrease drinking following alcohol-related vehicular injury. 108 young- adult drinking drivers (85 males and 23 females) were enrolled in the study following a serious vehicular injury. Mean age was 29.41 years, mean BAC was 166.80 mg/dL and mean Injury Severity Score was 10.29. In addition to drinking and driving, one risk-taking behavior was defined as lack of safety restraint use as identified by the police crash report. Self-reported tobacco and drug use as well as questions about precocious (prior to the age of 15) sexual practices and violent behavior were also considered indicators of risk-taking. Within the protocol for the randomized clinical trial, subjects were interviewed by specially trained nurse clinicians during hospitalization for alcohol-related MVC. Subjects who had a positive screen for alcohol dependence were excluded from the study and referred for more intensive evaluation. Subjects were interviewed in private with assurances of confidentiality. Crash records were obtained from the municipality where the crash took place. 61 per cent of seriously injured drinking drivers did not use safety restraints. 84 per cent used at least one tobacco product per day. Prior to the age of 15, more than a fourth of seriously injured drinking drivers often skipped school, got suspended or expelled from school, shoplifted or stole, or had sexual intercourse with more than one person. In addition, 58 per cent acknowledged marijuana use in the year preceding the crash. Non-alcohol dependent, young-adult drinking drivers demonstrated a pattern of risky behaviors that exceeded national norms. Legislation and interventions targeted solely to reduce driving while under the influence of alcohol may be ineffective in managing a more pervasive pattern of risk-taking. A comprehensive health policy program to explore the impact of a broad spectrum of risky behaviors such as alcohol and drug use, seat belt compliance, and safe sexual practices are needed. Implementation of interventions may then limit the risk of future injury, disability, and death in the at-risk population of drinking drivers. In addition, when drinking drivers change risky driving behaviors, the population at large will be saferon the road.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut

VTI:s bibliotek i Linköping
bibliotek@vti.se

Available

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of risk-taking behaviors among young-adult drinking drivers who were seriously injured in motor vehicle crashes. The data for this study were collected as part of a randomized clinical trial testing the effectiveness of brief interventions to decrease drinking following alcohol-related vehicular injury. 108 young- adult drinking drivers (85 males and 23 females) were enrolled in the study following a serious vehicular injury. Mean age was 29.41 years, mean BAC was 166.80 mg/dL and mean Injury Severity Score was 10.29. In addition to drinking and driving, one risk-taking behavior was defined as lack of safety restraint use as identified by the police crash report. Self-reported tobacco and drug use as well as questions about precocious (prior to the age of 15) sexual practices and violent behavior were also considered indicators of risk-taking. Within the protocol for the randomized clinical trial, subjects were interviewed by specially trained nurse clinicians during hospitalization for alcohol-related MVC. Subjects who had a positive screen for alcohol dependence were excluded from the study and referred for more intensive evaluation. Subjects were interviewed in private with assurances of confidentiality. Crash records were obtained from the municipality where the crash took place. 61 per cent of seriously injured drinking drivers did not use safety restraints. 84 per cent used at least one tobacco product per day. Prior to the age of 15, more than a fourth of seriously injured drinking drivers often skipped school, got suspended or expelled from school, shoplifted or stole, or had sexual intercourse with more than one person. In addition, 58 per cent acknowledged marijuana use in the year preceding the crash. Non-alcohol dependent, young-adult drinking drivers demonstrated a pattern of risky behaviors that exceeded national norms. Legislation and interventions targeted solely to reduce driving while under the influence of alcohol may be ineffective in managing a more pervasive pattern of risk-taking. A comprehensive health policy program to explore the impact of a broad spectrum of risky behaviors such as alcohol and drug use, seat belt compliance, and safe sexual practices are needed. Implementation of interventions may then limit the risk of future injury, disability, and death in the at-risk population of drinking drivers. In addition, when drinking drivers change risky driving behaviors, the population at large will be saferon the road.

Powered by Koha