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The compact integrated pupillograph CIP (AMTech) - its value on detection of psychophysical disord er caused by drugs Priemer, F ; Sachs, H

By: Priemer, FContributor(s): Sachs, HPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 5 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Drugs | Detection | Measurement | Driver | Eye movement | Apparatus | Drunkenness | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: There has been a renaissance of pupillography in Germany since the beginning of the 90s, concerning several subjects of human medicine, e.g. ophthalmology, psychiatry, otolaryngology or pharmacology. Changes of pupil reaction allow an exact interpretation of brain function because of the autonomous innervation of the pupil muscles. Considering the increase of drug influenced drivers, it becomes more and more necessary to create tests to identify drug influenced drivers. Since 1995 we have access to the compact integrated pupillograph CIP, which allows reliable measurements of pupil dynamics as well as eye movements. The principle of measurement is based on infrared reflection. Up to now, the following items have been examined by the CIP: 1) onset of sleepiness waves (SW) during alcohol impairment; 2) onset of the horizontal-gaze-nystagmus (HGN) during alcohol impairment; 3) impairment of the pupillary light reflex (PLR) during influence of alcohol or cannabis; 4) saccadic eyemovements (SEM) during influence of alcohol or cannabis; and 4) impairment of the pupillary light reflex and of saccadic eye movements during sleep deprivation. The device seems to be very effective to examine effects of various psychoactive substances on brain function or vision control, respectively. The CIP is a mobile measuring device, which could also be used in the field. At the present, the interpretation of results is difficult because of the missing baseline values of the same subject in a sober state. But first results of a running study with ecstasy and some examinations in front of a disco confirm the impression, that the CIP as a pretest device for recognition of drug impaired drivers is probably not only a vision.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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There has been a renaissance of pupillography in Germany since the beginning of the 90s, concerning several subjects of human medicine, e.g. ophthalmology, psychiatry, otolaryngology or pharmacology. Changes of pupil reaction allow an exact interpretation of brain function because of the autonomous innervation of the pupil muscles. Considering the increase of drug influenced drivers, it becomes more and more necessary to create tests to identify drug influenced drivers. Since 1995 we have access to the compact integrated pupillograph CIP, which allows reliable measurements of pupil dynamics as well as eye movements. The principle of measurement is based on infrared reflection. Up to now, the following items have been examined by the CIP: 1) onset of sleepiness waves (SW) during alcohol impairment; 2) onset of the horizontal-gaze-nystagmus (HGN) during alcohol impairment; 3) impairment of the pupillary light reflex (PLR) during influence of alcohol or cannabis; 4) saccadic eyemovements (SEM) during influence of alcohol or cannabis; and 4) impairment of the pupillary light reflex and of saccadic eye movements during sleep deprivation. The device seems to be very effective to examine effects of various psychoactive substances on brain function or vision control, respectively. The CIP is a mobile measuring device, which could also be used in the field. At the present, the interpretation of results is difficult because of the missing baseline values of the same subject in a sober state. But first results of a running study with ecstasy and some examinations in front of a disco confirm the impression, that the CIP as a pretest device for recognition of drug impaired drivers is probably not only a vision.

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