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Drug recognition and field impairment testing : Evaluation of trials Jackson, PG ; Tunbridge, RJ ; Rowe, DJ

By: Jackson, PGContributor(s): Tunbridge, RJ | Rowe, DJPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 7 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Drugs | In situ | Detection | Police | Education | Drunkenness | | Method | Efficiency | Recommendations | United Kingdom | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: It is apparent from the large number of negative breath tests and the small number of drugs driving submissions, that in the case of a negative BrAC result police officers are not considering whether a person may be impaired through drugs. This may be due to a lack of skills in identifying the signs of drug use in a driver. Drug Recognition Training (DRT) for police officers has recently been initiated. Police officers from 6 forces received training in drug impairment recognition and also in the administration of a standardised Field Impairment Test (FIT). These officers then applied their training in a real world setting for a period of 2 months. As a comparison, specially trained TRL researchers have also used these techniques at 2 city locations. Young people exiting clubs and pubs were invited to provide a saliva sample and perform the tests involved in DRT/FIT. All samples (from both the police and TRL trials) have been analysed by independent forensic laboratories. Results show that the DRT/FIT techniques are very useful in identifying impairment and the likely drug group responsible. This paper reports the results of both sets of trials and provides a list of recommendations based on experiences of the police and the TRL team.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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It is apparent from the large number of negative breath tests and the small number of drugs driving submissions, that in the case of a negative BrAC result police officers are not considering whether a person may be impaired through drugs. This may be due to a lack of skills in identifying the signs of drug use in a driver. Drug Recognition Training (DRT) for police officers has recently been initiated. Police officers from 6 forces received training in drug impairment recognition and also in the administration of a standardised Field Impairment Test (FIT). These officers then applied their training in a real world setting for a period of 2 months. As a comparison, specially trained TRL researchers have also used these techniques at 2 city locations. Young people exiting clubs and pubs were invited to provide a saliva sample and perform the tests involved in DRT/FIT. All samples (from both the police and TRL trials) have been analysed by independent forensic laboratories. Results show that the DRT/FIT techniques are very useful in identifying impairment and the likely drug group responsible. This paper reports the results of both sets of trials and provides a list of recommendations based on experiences of the police and the TRL team.

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