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The contribution of illness and drug treatment to crash fatalities in older drivers Odell, M

By: Odell, MPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 5 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Old people | Fatality | Accident rate | Illness | Medication | Driving aptitude | Cause | Accident | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: As the population ages, an increase in medical reviews of drivers suffering from age related conditions may be expected. A study was conducted in order to ascertain whether older drivers were over-represented in crash deaths in Victoria and whether the licensing authority medical review process was aware of them beforehand. Coroner s records for drivers aged over 70 who died in crashes during the years 1996 and 1997 were reviewed. The results are presented. While a minority of drivers involved in fatal accidents were known to the authority, it is possible that many drivers not known to the authority may have been suffering from conditions that could have affected their driving. Many of the drivers were taking drugs that could have affected their driving skills and these may not have been known to their doctors. Although the total numbers were small, the proportionately large number of drivers taking the anticoagulant Warfarin suggests that further studies may be worthwhile.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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As the population ages, an increase in medical reviews of drivers suffering from age related conditions may be expected. A study was conducted in order to ascertain whether older drivers were over-represented in crash deaths in Victoria and whether the licensing authority medical review process was aware of them beforehand. Coroner s records for drivers aged over 70 who died in crashes during the years 1996 and 1997 were reviewed. The results are presented. While a minority of drivers involved in fatal accidents were known to the authority, it is possible that many drivers not known to the authority may have been suffering from conditions that could have affected their driving. Many of the drivers were taking drugs that could have affected their driving skills and these may not have been known to their doctors. Although the total numbers were small, the proportionately large number of drivers taking the anticoagulant Warfarin suggests that further studies may be worthwhile.

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