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How come sensible people drive after drinking? Hutchinson, P

By: Hutchinson, PPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 6 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Drunken driving | Decision process | Offender | Cause | Motivation | Comprehension | Blood alcohol content | Driving aptitude | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: In-depth interviews with 48 male convicted drink drivers, 54.2 per cent with multiple convictions, gave 80 offences to analyse. For 28.75 per cent conviction is a fair cop but for many of these there is no accurate knowledge of the link between alcohol intake and BAC. When this is allied to a further 21.25 per cent who would have behaved differently had they had sound alcohol information it points to the importance of improving alcohol education for all drivers. A further 17.5 per cent were going through emotional times in which they were unable to think straight and a further 5 per cent with minds pre-occupied took decisions to drive which they may not otherwise have done. A further 11.25 per cent had drunk too much to take or stay with a safe decision and chose to drive. In 6.25 per cent cases the intention to leave the car was changed and for 10 per cent there was no intent but technical offences were committed. The implications for public policy are explored.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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In-depth interviews with 48 male convicted drink drivers, 54.2 per cent with multiple convictions, gave 80 offences to analyse. For 28.75 per cent conviction is a fair cop but for many of these there is no accurate knowledge of the link between alcohol intake and BAC. When this is allied to a further 21.25 per cent who would have behaved differently had they had sound alcohol information it points to the importance of improving alcohol education for all drivers. A further 17.5 per cent were going through emotional times in which they were unable to think straight and a further 5 per cent with minds pre-occupied took decisions to drive which they may not otherwise have done. A further 11.25 per cent had drunk too much to take or stay with a safe decision and chose to drive. In 6.25 per cent cases the intention to leave the car was changed and for 10 per cent there was no intent but technical offences were committed. The implications for public policy are explored.

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