The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Drug-driving policy approaches to minimizing risk Huessy, FB

By: Huessy, FBPublication details: Alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, 2000; T2000, Stockholm, May 22-26, 2000. Paper, Description: 7 sSubject(s): Sweden | Conference | Detection | Drugs | Working group | Europe | Legislation | Risk | Behaviour | Social factors | Prevention | | Standardization | Test method | Police | Education | 842Bibl.nr: VTI P4030:15Location: Abstract: The Council of Europe s Drugs in Road Traffic Project (the Pompidou Group) identified several crucial legal, social, and political elements of minimising the risk of drug- influenced driving behaviour on European roadways. This paper summarises the identified elements and proposes policy approaches for achieving risk minimisation whether in Europe or elsewhere. In addition to the conclusions and recommendations identified in the Council of Europe Drugs in Road Traffic report, the following observations serve to augment the considerations articulated at the roundtable discussions: 1) A key element of an effective risk minimisation policy approach could be the integration of community responsiveness with appropriately evaluated, affordable technological enhancements like drug screening devices; 2) Finding effective ways to reduce impulsive behaviour should result in a greater minimisation of risk on roadways; 3) The drug-driving problem involves health, justice, transportation, and science issues. Thus, its solution is more likely to succeed if co-operative, interdisciplinary professional activity exists; 4) Effective training programs for drug recognition, drug impairment, and drugs and driving are needed for police officers. The exchange of methods and experiences in detection and police enforcement between and among countries should be encouraged; 5) Procedures used by national forensic laboratories for assaying and reporting illicit (and prescription) drugs should be standardised across the European countries; 6) There is a need for well-designed, carefully implemented, and critically evaluated drugs-and- driving prevention programs; and 7) Successful models for debt forgiveness should be examined for their relevance in minimising risk from drug-driving.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut

VTI:s bibliotek i Linköping
bibliotek@vti.se

Available

The Council of Europe s Drugs in Road Traffic Project (the Pompidou Group) identified several crucial legal, social, and political elements of minimising the risk of drug- influenced driving behaviour on European roadways. This paper summarises the identified elements and proposes policy approaches for achieving risk minimisation whether in Europe or elsewhere. In addition to the conclusions and recommendations identified in the Council of Europe Drugs in Road Traffic report, the following observations serve to augment the considerations articulated at the roundtable discussions: 1) A key element of an effective risk minimisation policy approach could be the integration of community responsiveness with appropriately evaluated, affordable technological enhancements like drug screening devices; 2) Finding effective ways to reduce impulsive behaviour should result in a greater minimisation of risk on roadways; 3) The drug-driving problem involves health, justice, transportation, and science issues. Thus, its solution is more likely to succeed if co-operative, interdisciplinary professional activity exists; 4) Effective training programs for drug recognition, drug impairment, and drugs and driving are needed for police officers. The exchange of methods and experiences in detection and police enforcement between and among countries should be encouraged; 5) Procedures used by national forensic laboratories for assaying and reporting illicit (and prescription) drugs should be standardised across the European countries; 6) There is a need for well-designed, carefully implemented, and critically evaluated drugs-and- driving prevention programs; and 7) Successful models for debt forgiveness should be examined for their relevance in minimising risk from drug-driving.

Powered by Koha