The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

From victims to customers : The views of Britain's motorists on how we pay for roads. Developing Britain's transport system to rival the best in Europe

By: AA Motoring TrustPublication details: Basingstoke AA Motoring Trust, 2002Description: 12 s, 196 kbyteSubject(s): Road pricing | Driver | | Method | Payment | | Motorway | Main road | Urban area | United Kingdom | 11 | 02Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: In 2003, motorists will be required for the first time to pay additional tolls to drive on lengths of both motorway and city roads in Britain. Following new legislation to allow tolling, government funded studies have recommended that tolls should be levied on roads of all types across Britain. If these schemes were implemented, motorists would in future pay tolls by the mile across significant parts of the country. One government appointed commission has urged that motorists should pay by the mile for all motoring with billing based on satellite tracking - this system is already being introduced for charging trucks in 2006. These wide ranging plans to change the way motorists pay for motoring have been drawn up on theoretical grounds. There is no UK experience of tolling outside estuarial crossings. There is little international experience of using tolls to meter congested traffic by raising prices in busy periods. Most experience of tolling is from countries whohave built their rural motorways as a system of toll roads. Yet the advocates of road pricing have argued with extraordinary confidence that the benefits of reducing congestion will outweigh the costs and practical problems. The impacts of changing the way we pay on family budgets, on getting to work, or on how lives are lived have been seen by the producers of Britain's road system as incidental issues to be managed later. Ministers have been urged to press on with courage. This report fills a large gap in research by asking what Britain's largest customers of the road say and think about different systems of paying for roads - and proposing what might be done to bridge the gulf that now exists between producers and consumers.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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In 2003, motorists will be required for the first time to pay additional tolls to drive on lengths of both motorway and city roads in Britain. Following new legislation to allow tolling, government funded studies have recommended that tolls should be levied on roads of all types across Britain. If these schemes were implemented, motorists would in future pay tolls by the mile across significant parts of the country. One government appointed commission has urged that motorists should pay by the mile for all motoring with billing based on satellite tracking - this system is already being introduced for charging trucks in 2006. These wide ranging plans to change the way motorists pay for motoring have been drawn up on theoretical grounds. There is no UK experience of tolling outside estuarial crossings. There is little international experience of using tolls to meter congested traffic by raising prices in busy periods. Most experience of tolling is from countries whohave built their rural motorways as a system of toll roads. Yet the advocates of road pricing have argued with extraordinary confidence that the benefits of reducing congestion will outweigh the costs and practical problems. The impacts of changing the way we pay on family budgets, on getting to work, or on how lives are lived have been seen by the producers of Britain's road system as incidental issues to be managed later. Ministers have been urged to press on with courage. This report fills a large gap in research by asking what Britain's largest customers of the road say and think about different systems of paying for roads - and proposing what might be done to bridge the gulf that now exists between producers and consumers.

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