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Cost- and longevity-based scheduling of paint and thermoplastic striping Abboud, Nasser ; Bowman, Brian L

By: Abboud, NasserContributor(s): Bowman, Brian LPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2002Description: nr 1794, s. 55-62Subject(s): USA | Carriageway marking | Thermoplastic | Paint | | Cost | Durability | Accident rate | Regression analysis | Reflectivity | Deterioration | 55 | 22Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2002 RefLocation: Abstract: Because no national guidelines exist on establishing pavement marking service life, the scheduling of road striping has been inconsistent among maintenance agencies. This study establishes a way to set striping schedules that accounts for factors affecting scheduling, mainly application cost, service lifetime, and user cost relative to crashes during the striping lifetime. Striping useful lifetime is defined as the striping age beyond which pavement markings become ineffective in relaying necessary vehicle positioning information, when deteriorated pavement marking retroreflectivity reaches a minimum acceptable value. An exponential regression model was used to depict the relationship between striping age and average daily traffic (ADT), using a retroreflectivity threshold of 150 mcd/sq m/lx. Striping useful lifetime was established for ADT levels using exponential regression analysis. Application costs were based on the latest available unit costs from the Alabama Department of Transportation for white and yellow longitudinal stripes of paint and thermoplastic markings. Using the National Safety Council estimates of crash severities, user costs were based on the dollar equivalency of the damage to vehicles and occupants in retroreflectivity-related crashes. The data were extracted from the crash experience of approximately 1,300 mi (2100 km) of state highways in 32 Alabama counties. For use in scheduling striping, paint and thermoplastic striping costs were compared on an equivalent annual basis, accounting for application and user costs. Although the crash data and retroreflectivity data were collected on Alabama roads, the findings and conclusions are applicable to areas of warmer climate where snowfall is uncommon.
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Because no national guidelines exist on establishing pavement marking service life, the scheduling of road striping has been inconsistent among maintenance agencies. This study establishes a way to set striping schedules that accounts for factors affecting scheduling, mainly application cost, service lifetime, and user cost relative to crashes during the striping lifetime. Striping useful lifetime is defined as the striping age beyond which pavement markings become ineffective in relaying necessary vehicle positioning information, when deteriorated pavement marking retroreflectivity reaches a minimum acceptable value. An exponential regression model was used to depict the relationship between striping age and average daily traffic (ADT), using a retroreflectivity threshold of 150 mcd/sq m/lx. Striping useful lifetime was established for ADT levels using exponential regression analysis. Application costs were based on the latest available unit costs from the Alabama Department of Transportation for white and yellow longitudinal stripes of paint and thermoplastic markings. Using the National Safety Council estimates of crash severities, user costs were based on the dollar equivalency of the damage to vehicles and occupants in retroreflectivity-related crashes. The data were extracted from the crash experience of approximately 1,300 mi (2100 km) of state highways in 32 Alabama counties. For use in scheduling striping, paint and thermoplastic striping costs were compared on an equivalent annual basis, accounting for application and user costs. Although the crash data and retroreflectivity data were collected on Alabama roads, the findings and conclusions are applicable to areas of warmer climate where snowfall is uncommon.

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