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Assessment of NCHRP report 350 test vehicles Mak, King K ; Bligh, Roger P

By: Mak, King KContributor(s): Bligh, Roger PPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2002Description: nr 1797, s. 33-7Subject(s): USA | Safety fence | Specifications | | | Test method | Delivery vehicle | Car | Recommendations | 34 | 91Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2002 RefLocation: Abstract: The appropriateness of test vehicles specified in NCHRP Report 350 was assessed, including (a) whether the 2000-kg, three-quarter-ton pickup truck should continue to be used as a test vehicle, and if not, what replacement vehicle would be appropriate; (b) whether the 820-kg passenger car should continue to be used as a test vehicle, and if not, what replacement vehicle would be appropriate; and (c) whether another test vehicle should be added to the matrix--for example, an intermediate-sized passenger car. From the analysis, the following conclusions and recommendations were drawn: (a) The three-quarter-ton pickup truck appears to be a good surrogate for the light truck subclasses. The recommendation is to keep the 2000-kg, three-quarter-ton pickup truck as one of the design test vehicles in the update of the guidelines for NCHRP Report 350. (b) A potential problem is the availability of three-quarter-ton pickup trucks with standard cabs. An alternative design test vehicle may be an intermediate-sized sport utility vehicle. (c) The availability of the 820-kg passenger car design test vehicle will be a problem within the next few years. The recommendation is to keep the current test vehicle as long as it is still readily available, or until the NCHRP Report 350 guidelines are updated, and to increase the curb weight to a level consistent with the curb weights of the two smallest passenger cars with reasonably high sales volume. (d) The addition of a third design vehicle--for example, a 1500-kg intermediate-sized passenger car--to ensure that a roadside feature performs satisfactorily across the entire vehicle spectrum is highly desirable but cost-prohibitive. The addition of an intermediate-sized design test vehicle is therefore not recommended except in situations in which there is a perceived concern that the device may not function properly when impacted by an intermediate-sized vehicle.
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The appropriateness of test vehicles specified in NCHRP Report 350 was assessed, including (a) whether the 2000-kg, three-quarter-ton pickup truck should continue to be used as a test vehicle, and if not, what replacement vehicle would be appropriate; (b) whether the 820-kg passenger car should continue to be used as a test vehicle, and if not, what replacement vehicle would be appropriate; and (c) whether another test vehicle should be added to the matrix--for example, an intermediate-sized passenger car. From the analysis, the following conclusions and recommendations were drawn: (a) The three-quarter-ton pickup truck appears to be a good surrogate for the light truck subclasses. The recommendation is to keep the 2000-kg, three-quarter-ton pickup truck as one of the design test vehicles in the update of the guidelines for NCHRP Report 350. (b) A potential problem is the availability of three-quarter-ton pickup trucks with standard cabs. An alternative design test vehicle may be an intermediate-sized sport utility vehicle. (c) The availability of the 820-kg passenger car design test vehicle will be a problem within the next few years. The recommendation is to keep the current test vehicle as long as it is still readily available, or until the NCHRP Report 350 guidelines are updated, and to increase the curb weight to a level consistent with the curb weights of the two smallest passenger cars with reasonably high sales volume. (d) The addition of a third design vehicle--for example, a 1500-kg intermediate-sized passenger car--to ensure that a roadside feature performs satisfactorily across the entire vehicle spectrum is highly desirable but cost-prohibitive. The addition of an intermediate-sized design test vehicle is therefore not recommended except in situations in which there is a perceived concern that the device may not function properly when impacted by an intermediate-sized vehicle.

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