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Characterization of particles in Lycksele and Gothenburg Hedberg, Emma et al

By: Hedberg, EmmaPublication details: Stockholm Stockholms universitet, 2001; Institutet för tillämpad miljöforskning, ; ITM-rapport 92:2001, Description: 445 KBSubject(s): Sweden | Particle | Measurement | Season | Winter | Rural area | Urban area | Energy | Traffic | Emission | 15 | UhOnline resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: In some small towns in Sweden, the concentration of particles can sometimes increase to extreme levels, especially during stable meteorological conditions. The towns are characterised by a large extent of residential wood burning, beside other local particle sources such as vehicle exhaust, road traffic resuspension and long-distance transport. Lycksele in Northern Sweden was chosen to represent a typical small town characterised by residential wood burning. Gothenburg in Southern Sweden represented a site dominated by road traffic. During a winter-period, the amount of particulate PAH per unit particulate mass<2.5 m in diameter (PM2.5), was larger in Lycksele than in Gothenburg. It was also found that five PAHs, known for their carcinogenicity, were present in higher concentrations in Lycksele than in Gothenburg during the winter-period. During spring the concentration in Lycksele was lower than in Gothenburg. The concentration in Gothenburg did not change between the periods. The sources to PM2.5 in Lycksele was estimated using two independent source-receptor methods, principal components analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). The average contribution to PM2.5 from wood burning during the winter-period was estimated to range between 9-34%. The particle contribution from wood burning during extreme cold winter nights could be as high as 70%. The average contribution to PM2.5 from wood burning was similar to the contribution from road traffic, using the PMF-method, but 25-33% of the road traffic contribution using the PCA-method. During the spring period, the average contribution from resuspension to PM2.5 in Lycksele was estimated to be about 70%. The PAH-data from the winterperiod in Lycksele was analysed using three multivariate methods, PCA, PMF and chemical mass balance (CMB). The contribution from road traffic to total mass PAH was similar to the contribution from wood burning.
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In some small towns in Sweden, the concentration of particles can sometimes increase to extreme levels, especially during stable meteorological conditions. The towns are characterised by a large extent of residential wood burning, beside other local particle sources such as vehicle exhaust, road traffic resuspension and long-distance transport. Lycksele in Northern Sweden was chosen to represent a typical small town characterised by residential wood burning. Gothenburg in Southern Sweden represented a site dominated by road traffic. During a winter-period, the amount of particulate PAH per unit particulate mass<2.5 m in diameter (PM2.5), was larger in Lycksele than in Gothenburg. It was also found that five PAHs, known for their carcinogenicity, were present in higher concentrations in Lycksele than in Gothenburg during the winter-period. During spring the concentration in Lycksele was lower than in Gothenburg. The concentration in Gothenburg did not change between the periods. The sources to PM2.5 in Lycksele was estimated using two independent source-receptor methods, principal components analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). The average contribution to PM2.5 from wood burning during the winter-period was estimated to range between 9-34%. The particle contribution from wood burning during extreme cold winter nights could be as high as 70%. The average contribution to PM2.5 from wood burning was similar to the contribution from road traffic, using the PMF-method, but 25-33% of the road traffic contribution using the PCA-method. During the spring period, the average contribution from resuspension to PM2.5 in Lycksele was estimated to be about 70%. The PAH-data from the winterperiod in Lycksele was analysed using three multivariate methods, PCA, PMF and chemical mass balance (CMB). The contribution from road traffic to total mass PAH was similar to the contribution from wood burning.

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