The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Teleworkers, trips, and telecommunications : Technology drives telework - but does it reduce trips? Pratt, Joanne H

By: Pratt, Joanne HPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2002Description: nr 1817, s. 58-66Subject(s): USA | Teleworking | Journey | | Impact study | Telecommunication | Technology | Development | Statistics | 11Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2002 RefLocation: Abstract: Work-at-home data from federal and proprietary survey series are analyzed to determine why counts of people who work at home do not agree and to gain new insight into the impact of technology and telecommunications on telework and trip reduction. Questions were added to surveys including the American Housing Survey, Current Population Survey, and nationwide personal transportation survey by using a piggybacking strategy. The analysis found that the total number of persons who work at home as a percentage of total workers appears to be holding steady at about 16% to 17%. Similarly, the number of employees doing any work at home has not markedly increased. Work at home during the business day has risen sharply, apparently because of the increased availability of personal computers and the Internet in homes, but the rise may be leveling off. The analysis suggests that the occupational groups most likely to increase in numbers and frequency of teleworking are managerial and professional groups and sales. Countertrends that may decrease telework are discussed. The analysis illustrates the value of adding work-at-home questions to employment, housing, and technology surveys as well as to travel surveys. It emphasizes the need for consistency in questioning over time and the elimination of the use of jargon from surveys so that trends can be monitored.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Work-at-home data from federal and proprietary survey series are analyzed to determine why counts of people who work at home do not agree and to gain new insight into the impact of technology and telecommunications on telework and trip reduction. Questions were added to surveys including the American Housing Survey, Current Population Survey, and nationwide personal transportation survey by using a piggybacking strategy. The analysis found that the total number of persons who work at home as a percentage of total workers appears to be holding steady at about 16% to 17%. Similarly, the number of employees doing any work at home has not markedly increased. Work at home during the business day has risen sharply, apparently because of the increased availability of personal computers and the Internet in homes, but the rise may be leveling off. The analysis suggests that the occupational groups most likely to increase in numbers and frequency of teleworking are managerial and professional groups and sales. Countertrends that may decrease telework are discussed. The analysis illustrates the value of adding work-at-home questions to employment, housing, and technology surveys as well as to travel surveys. It emphasizes the need for consistency in questioning over time and the elimination of the use of jargon from surveys so that trends can be monitored.

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