The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Changing behaviors to prevent drowsy driving and promote traffic safety : Review of proven, promising, and unproven techniques. Final report Nguyen, Lan T ; Jauregui, Beatrice ; Dinges, David F

By: Nguyen, Lan TContributor(s): Jauregui, Beatrice | Dinges, David FPublication details: Washington DC American Automobile Association Foundation for, 1998; Traffic Safety, Description: 47 s, 140 KBSubject(s): Method | Prevention | Expert opinion | Questionnaire | USA | 841Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: Excessive sleepiness may result in an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash either because the motorist falls asleep while driving or because he experiences reduced attention to road events and driving tasks due to fatigue/sleepiness. These crashes are primarily of the "drift-off-the-road" sort, as driving off the road may reflect the behavior of a sleepy driver. The amount of legal and scientific evidence regarding driver fatigue is large enough to warrant special attention towards investigating ways of preventing crashes that have drowsiness as a major contributing factor to the cause. It is assumed that drivers engage in a variety of behaviors to remain alert at the wheel. However, very little is known about the actual techniques employed to stay awake. Many agencies as well as individuals advocate engaging in certain types of behaviors in order to stay awake, such as rolling down the window or stopping to ingest some caffeine or a meal. Some experienced drivers claim that certain things work better than others. However, there have been no findings of definitive proof that any of these behaviors are more effective than others, or that they sustain alertness for an extended period. This study aims to examine the countermeasures that have been shown to be effective, ineffective, or potentially effective in combating drowsy driving. We found that few, if any, empirical studies have revealed definitive proof of what measures may be effective in combating drowsiness while driving. Thus, we endeavored to design a study which would assess not only experts' opinions with respect to the effectiveness of certain behavioral countermeasures but also the extent to which this population could cite definitive scientific evidence regarding proven, disproved or promising techniques. We were aware of several rumored empirical studies into this area, and hoped to uncover any data, published or not, that would provide some proof of any effective measures. We devised a survey and sent it to 1221 persons who possessed interest and expertise in the area of fatigue research, of which 283 responded. The respondents' feedback supported our hypothesis that there exists little if any scientific proof of what behaviors are effective (or ineffective) countermeasures to drowsiness while driving. The data also indicated that most people, regardless of their occupation, level of education, and any other demographic characteristics, agree that there is no substitute for sleep.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
No physical items for this record

Excessive sleepiness may result in an increased risk of a motor vehicle crash either because the motorist falls asleep while driving or because he experiences reduced attention to road events and driving tasks due to fatigue/sleepiness. These crashes are primarily of the "drift-off-the-road" sort, as driving off the road may reflect the behavior of a sleepy driver. The amount of legal and scientific evidence regarding driver fatigue is large enough to warrant special attention towards investigating ways of preventing crashes that have drowsiness as a major contributing factor to the cause. It is assumed that drivers engage in a variety of behaviors to remain alert at the wheel. However, very little is known about the actual techniques employed to stay awake. Many agencies as well as individuals advocate engaging in certain types of behaviors in order to stay awake, such as rolling down the window or stopping to ingest some caffeine or a meal. Some experienced drivers claim that certain things work better than others. However, there have been no findings of definitive proof that any of these behaviors are more effective than others, or that they sustain alertness for an extended period. This study aims to examine the countermeasures that have been shown to be effective, ineffective, or potentially effective in combating drowsy driving. We found that few, if any, empirical studies have revealed definitive proof of what measures may be effective in combating drowsiness while driving. Thus, we endeavored to design a study which would assess not only experts' opinions with respect to the effectiveness of certain behavioral countermeasures but also the extent to which this population could cite definitive scientific evidence regarding proven, disproved or promising techniques. We were aware of several rumored empirical studies into this area, and hoped to uncover any data, published or not, that would provide some proof of any effective measures. We devised a survey and sent it to 1221 persons who possessed interest and expertise in the area of fatigue research, of which 283 responded. The respondents' feedback supported our hypothesis that there exists little if any scientific proof of what behaviors are effective (or ineffective) countermeasures to drowsiness while driving. The data also indicated that most people, regardless of their occupation, level of education, and any other demographic characteristics, agree that there is no substitute for sleep.

Powered by Koha