The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

IT och globalisering. En essä Larsson, Emma

By: Larsson, EmmaPublication details: Linköping Linköpings universitet, 2001; Ekonomiska institutionen, ; Statsvetenskap 2001/04, Description: 64 sSubject(s): Sweden | Developing countries | Development | | Policy | Internet | | Qa | OcOnline resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: The aim of this thesis has been to attempt to explore whether Information Technology (IT) creates possibilities for those developing nations, which used to be called the Third World, to develop further with sustained economic growth. Or, if IT is currently widening the gap between developing and developed nations. In the discussion, the author has raised the issue of whether globalisation and IT can contribute positively within a new political order, one that is based on dialogue and consent rather than power and force. The author has also attempted to address the issue of whether globalisation and IT can contribute to an increased justice in the world. The theory used by the author is Andrew Linklater's ”Triple Transformation of Political Community.” Linklater's aim is to secure a greater respect for cultural differences with stronger commitments to the reduction of material inequalities and significant advances in universality. The author suggests some ways on how it may be possible for IT to contribute to advances in universality and perhaps be able to secure a greater respect for cultural differences. It is suggested that this is possible because IT, and especially the Internet, are mediums where dialogue and communication exist at their central core. The author feels that dialogue and consent are prerequisites for humankind to achieve a more harmonic and fairer Post-Westphalia era. However, the author feels that the use of IT has not been shown to achieve a reduction of material inequalities. A majority of the world's inhabitants are still materially poor when compared to the standards of developed nations. These material inequalities still persist despite IT. Within developing nations, the lack of a basic infrastructure for telecommunications is believed to be a factor in their slow economic development.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
No physical items for this record

The aim of this thesis has been to attempt to explore whether Information Technology (IT) creates possibilities for those developing nations, which used to be called the Third World, to develop further with sustained economic growth. Or, if IT is currently widening the gap between developing and developed nations. In the discussion, the author has raised the issue of whether globalisation and IT can contribute positively within a new political order, one that is based on dialogue and consent rather than power and force. The author has also attempted to address the issue of whether globalisation and IT can contribute to an increased justice in the world. The theory used by the author is Andrew Linklater's ”Triple Transformation of Political Community.” Linklater's aim is to secure a greater respect for cultural differences with stronger commitments to the reduction of material inequalities and significant advances in universality. The author suggests some ways on how it may be possible for IT to contribute to advances in universality and perhaps be able to secure a greater respect for cultural differences. It is suggested that this is possible because IT, and especially the Internet, are mediums where dialogue and communication exist at their central core. The author feels that dialogue and consent are prerequisites for humankind to achieve a more harmonic and fairer Post-Westphalia era. However, the author feels that the use of IT has not been shown to achieve a reduction of material inequalities. A majority of the world's inhabitants are still materially poor when compared to the standards of developed nations. These material inequalities still persist despite IT. Within developing nations, the lack of a basic infrastructure for telecommunications is believed to be a factor in their slow economic development.

Powered by Koha