The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Cost-benefit analysis of of road safety improvements. Final report

By: ICF ConsultingContributor(s): Imperial College Centre for Transport StudiesPublication details: London ICF Consulting, 2003; Imperial College Centre for Transport Studies, Description: 463 Kb, 63 sSubject(s): Accident prevention | Traffic regulations | Cost benefit analysis | Speed limit | Safety belt | Drunken driving | Freight transport | Bus | Safety | United Kingdom | 845 | 02Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: Every year more than 40.000 people die and more than one million are injured in road crashes in the Member States of the European Union. As well as the human tragedy of so many deaths and injuries, road crashes have a substantial economic cost, in the order of 160 billion euros annually. It is the objective of the European Commission to reduce this toll by 50% by 2010. Among the many possible actions, the Commission believes that better enforcement of existing road safety laws can make a substantial contribution to meeting this objective. More specifically, two initiatives are envisaged: 1. Improving enforcement with respect to three important contributors to fatalities in road crashes - speeding, drunk driving and non-use of seat belts 2. Improving enforcement of existing European Commission road safety laws relating to commercial road transport To this end, the Commission intends to submit to the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers a package of two proposals for directives, one dealing with the enforcement of laws relating to speeding, drunk driving and non-use of seat belts with respect to all road users, and the other consisting of a 'refonte' of existing EU legal instruments dealing with enforcement of EU safety rules for commercial road transport. Before moving ahead with these initiatives, however, the European Commission wishes to analyse and document the benefits and costs of implementing the proposed directives, for the information of decision makers in the Parliament and Council. The analyses presented in this report provide an estimate of the costs and benefits for each of the two proposed initiatives. The results from a parallel effort by the legal firm, Clifford Chance, to document road safety laws and enforcement practices in the member states, has been incorporated into this analysis.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Every year more than 40.000 people die and more than one million are injured in road crashes in the Member States of the European Union. As well as the human tragedy of so many deaths and injuries, road crashes have a substantial economic cost, in the order of 160 billion euros annually. It is the objective of the European Commission to reduce this toll by 50% by 2010. Among the many possible actions, the Commission believes that better enforcement of existing road safety laws can make a substantial contribution to meeting this objective. More specifically, two initiatives are envisaged: 1. Improving enforcement with respect to three important contributors to fatalities in road crashes - speeding, drunk driving and non-use of seat belts 2. Improving enforcement of existing European Commission road safety laws relating to commercial road transport To this end, the Commission intends to submit to the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers a package of two proposals for directives, one dealing with the enforcement of laws relating to speeding, drunk driving and non-use of seat belts with respect to all road users, and the other consisting of a 'refonte' of existing EU legal instruments dealing with enforcement of EU safety rules for commercial road transport. Before moving ahead with these initiatives, however, the European Commission wishes to analyse and document the benefits and costs of implementing the proposed directives, for the information of decision makers in the Parliament and Council. The analyses presented in this report provide an estimate of the costs and benefits for each of the two proposed initiatives. The results from a parallel effort by the legal firm, Clifford Chance, to document road safety laws and enforcement practices in the member states, has been incorporated into this analysis.

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