The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Distractions in everyday driving Stutts, Jane

By: Stutts, JanePublication details: Washington DC AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 2003Description: 104 sSubject(s): Driver | Inattention | Attention | Accident | Cause | Classification | Measurement | USA | 841Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: This report presents the results of Phase II of a project funded by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety entitled, "The Role of Driver Distraction in Traffic Crashes." The Phase I report for the project contained the results of an analysis of five years of National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (CDS) data, along with crash narrative data from both the CDS and North Carolina crash reports (Stutts, Reinfurt, Staplin, and Rodgman, 2001). The goal of this initial phase of the project was to identify the major sources of distraction contributing to crashes and to develop a taxonomy of driver distractions that could be used to guide the Phase II efforts. The second phase of the project called for developing and validating a driving log methodology to determine the occurrence in the U.S. driving population of the various driver distractions identified in Phase I, and to examine the potential consequences of these distractions on driving performance.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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This report presents the results of Phase II of a project funded by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety entitled, "The Role of Driver Distraction in Traffic Crashes." The Phase I report for the project contained the results of an analysis of five years of National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (CDS) data, along with crash narrative data from both the CDS and North Carolina crash reports (Stutts, Reinfurt, Staplin, and Rodgman, 2001). The goal of this initial phase of the project was to identify the major sources of distraction contributing to crashes and to develop a taxonomy of driver distractions that could be used to guide the Phase II efforts. The second phase of the project called for developing and validating a driving log methodology to determine the occurrence in the U.S. driving population of the various driver distractions identified in Phase I, and to examine the potential consequences of these distractions on driving performance.

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