The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Guidance for implementation of the AASHTO Strategic Highway Safety Plan. Volume 5 : A guide for addressing unsignalized intersection collisions Neuman, Timothy R et al

By: Neuman, Timothy RPublication details: Washington DC National Cooperative Highway Research Program, 2003; NCHRP report 500:5, Description: 171 sISBN: 0309087600Subject(s): USA | Unsignalized junction | Accident prevention | Method | Geometric design | Left turn | Right turn | Traffic lane | Central reserve | Footway | Cycle track | Visibility distance | Vehicle spacing | | Rumble strip | Carriageway marking | Traffic sign | Traffic calming | 821 | 22 | 31Online resources: Publikation/Publication Bibl.nr: VTI P0409:500-5Location: Abstract: The six major areas of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Strategic Highway Safety Plan (Drivers, Vehicles, Special Users, Highways, Emergency Medical Services, and Management) are subdivided into 22 goals, or key emphasis areas, that impact highway safety. One of these goals addresses the improvement of safety at intersections. A key to improving intersection safety is to address safety problems at unsignalized intersections. This implementation guide provides guidance to highway agencies that want to implement safety improvements at unsignalized intersections and includes a variety of strategies that may be applicable to particular locations. Intersections are locations where two or more roads join or cross one another. The crossing and turning maneuvers that occur at intersections create opportunities for vehicle-vehicle, vehicle-pedestrian, and vehicle-bicycle conflicts, which may result in traffic crashes. Thus, intersections are likely points for concentrations of traffic crashes. Unsignalized intersections are of particular concern because there are so many of them on the U.S. highway system and because some experience sufficient numbers of particular crash types to indicate a need to improve safety. Unsignalized intersections represent potential hazards not present at signalized intersections because of the priority of movement on the main road. Vehicles stopping or slowing to turn create speed differentials between vehicles traveling in the same direction. This is particularly problematic on two-lane highways. The intersections along low- to moderatevolume roads in rural and suburban areas are usually unsignalized. These roadways are generally associated with high-speed travel and relatively lower geometrics than those in more developed suburban and urban areas.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings: VTI P0409:500-5

The six major areas of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Strategic Highway Safety Plan (Drivers, Vehicles, Special Users, Highways, Emergency Medical Services, and Management) are subdivided into 22 goals, or key emphasis areas, that impact highway safety. One of these goals addresses the improvement of safety at intersections. A key to improving intersection safety is to address safety problems at unsignalized intersections. This implementation guide provides guidance to highway agencies that want to implement safety improvements at unsignalized intersections and includes a variety of strategies that may be applicable to particular locations. Intersections are locations where two or more roads join or cross one another. The crossing and turning maneuvers that occur at intersections create opportunities for vehicle-vehicle, vehicle-pedestrian, and vehicle-bicycle conflicts, which may result in traffic crashes. Thus, intersections are likely points for concentrations of traffic crashes. Unsignalized intersections are of particular concern because there are so many of them on the U.S. highway system and because some experience sufficient numbers of particular crash types to indicate a need to improve safety. Unsignalized intersections represent potential hazards not present at signalized intersections because of the priority of movement on the main road. Vehicles stopping or slowing to turn create speed differentials between vehicles traveling in the same direction. This is particularly problematic on two-lane highways. The intersections along low- to moderatevolume roads in rural and suburban areas are usually unsignalized. These roadways are generally associated with high-speed travel and relatively lower geometrics than those in more developed suburban and urban areas.

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