The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Evaluation of Virginia's first heated bridge Hoppe, Edward J

By: Hoppe, Edward JPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2001Description: nr 1741, s. 199-206Subject(s): USA | Bridge heating | | Infrared | Photography | Sensor | Performance | | Control | | Winter maintenance | 35 | 71Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1741Location: Abstract: The goal of the Heated Bridge Technology Program, established in 1991 under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, is to find durable and environmentally friendly heated bridge technologies for ice and snow removal. The first heated bridge built in Virginia is evaluated. The bridge is on Route 60 over the Buffalo River in Amherst County. The project was monitored from its construction in 1995 through winter operations terminating in spring 2000. Data were collected remotely using an electronic data logger interfaced with various temperature and environmental sensors. An infrared camera was used to examine heat distribution across the bridge deck. The results of the study demonstrate that heat pipe technology can provide a feasible option for heating decks. However, substantial problems were encountered in getting the system to perform as designed. It appears that the control aspect of this technology requires additional improvements to ensure reliable operation under field conditions.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The goal of the Heated Bridge Technology Program, established in 1991 under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act, is to find durable and environmentally friendly heated bridge technologies for ice and snow removal. The first heated bridge built in Virginia is evaluated. The bridge is on Route 60 over the Buffalo River in Amherst County. The project was monitored from its construction in 1995 through winter operations terminating in spring 2000. Data were collected remotely using an electronic data logger interfaced with various temperature and environmental sensors. An infrared camera was used to examine heat distribution across the bridge deck. The results of the study demonstrate that heat pipe technology can provide a feasible option for heating decks. However, substantial problems were encountered in getting the system to perform as designed. It appears that the control aspect of this technology requires additional improvements to ensure reliable operation under field conditions.

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