The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

User worked and footpath level crossing research report : Railway Safety's response to the Arthur D Little research report. Summary report

By: Railway SafetyPublication details: London Railway Safety, 2002Description: 1 CD, 31 s. CDSubject(s): United Kingdom | Level crossing | Risk | Accident | Danger | Behaviour | Questionnaire | Simulation | J06Bibl.nr: VTI 2003.0730Location: Abstract: Residual risk associated with user-worked and footpath 'passive' crossings has remained constant over recent years, while that relating to automatic crossings has been substantially reduced through industry efforts. This study explored the hazards and risks at passive crossings, focusing in particular on user (driver and pedestrian) perception of risk. By surveying over 300 passive crossings, interviewing users, analysing accident data and working with industry experts, A D Little concluded that certain crossing and user characteristics constituted key risk influencing factors - gates being left open; high crossing utilisation; and trains running infrequently. Poor sight time and frequent and fast trains were associated with lower risk, as they seemed to increase user vigilance. A higher than expected proportion of accidents was found to involve road vehicles. Recommendations on risk control included technical enhancements to counter gate abuse, better road markings, consistent use of train whistles, and user education, as well as improved data collection.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings: VTI 2003.0730

Residual risk associated with user-worked and footpath 'passive' crossings has remained constant over recent years, while that relating to automatic crossings has been substantially reduced through industry efforts. This study explored the hazards and risks at passive crossings, focusing in particular on user (driver and pedestrian) perception of risk. By surveying over 300 passive crossings, interviewing users, analysing accident data and working with industry experts, A D Little concluded that certain crossing and user characteristics constituted key risk influencing factors - gates being left open; high crossing utilisation; and trains running infrequently. Poor sight time and frequent and fast trains were associated with lower risk, as they seemed to increase user vigilance. A higher than expected proportion of accidents was found to involve road vehicles. Recommendations on risk control included technical enhancements to counter gate abuse, better road markings, consistent use of train whistles, and user education, as well as improved data collection.

Powered by Koha