The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Computer-based pedestrian training resource

By: Department for TransportContributor(s): Road safety research report 27Publication details: London Department for Transport, [2000?]; Road safety research report 27, Description: 1358 kB100 sSubject(s): Education | Child | Pedestrian | Crossing the road | Simulation | Computer | United Kingdom | 843Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: Practical training in pedestrian skills is known to be highly effective at improving the performance of children as young as 5 years of age. When conducted at the roadside,however, this training can be time-consuming, labour intensive, and subject to disruption from poor weather and a lack of traffic situations of the types required. Training based on simulations offers a way round these difficulties, and experimental work suggests it has the potential to yield learning of comparable levels to roadside training. The current project aimed to realise this potential by producing computer-based training materials covering a range of pedestrian skills within a single programme. The effectiveness of this programmewas then evaluated via an implementation study involving children aged 5 to 11 years.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Practical training in pedestrian skills is known to be highly effective at improving the performance of children as young as 5 years of age. When conducted at the roadside,however, this training can be time-consuming, labour intensive, and subject to disruption from poor weather and a lack of traffic situations of the types required. Training based on simulations offers a way round these difficulties, and experimental work suggests it has the potential to yield learning of comparable levels to roadside training. The current project aimed to realise this potential by producing computer-based training materials covering a range of pedestrian skills within a single programme. The effectiveness of this programmewas then evaluated via an implementation study involving children aged 5 to 11 years.

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