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Asking transit users about transit-oriented design Ewing, Reid

By: Ewing, ReidPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1735, s. 19-24Subject(s): USA | Public transport | Bus | | Passenger | Expert opinion | | Characteristics | 111Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1735Location: Abstract: Visual-preference surveys are becoming popular in "visioning" projects, design charrettes, and other physical planning activities in which intensive public involvement is desired. In a survey, transit users, nonusers, and professionals were shown a series of paired slides of bus stops, asked to choose the stop from each pair at which they would prefer to wait, and asked to rate each stop chosen as a place to wait. Slides then were analyzed for content, with 19 features of bus stops and surroundings measured and quantified. Subsequent analysis showed that transit-oriented design features most affecting both choices and ratings are a bus shelter at the stop, trees along the street leading to the stop, a vertical curb at the stop, the setback of the stop from the street edge, and a continuous sidewalk leading to the stop. Such a survey may help transit planners choose the best transit-stop locations and devote financial resources to the most promising transit-stop amenities, given the inevitable tradeoffs involved.
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Visual-preference surveys are becoming popular in "visioning" projects, design charrettes, and other physical planning activities in which intensive public involvement is desired. In a survey, transit users, nonusers, and professionals were shown a series of paired slides of bus stops, asked to choose the stop from each pair at which they would prefer to wait, and asked to rate each stop chosen as a place to wait. Slides then were analyzed for content, with 19 features of bus stops and surroundings measured and quantified. Subsequent analysis showed that transit-oriented design features most affecting both choices and ratings are a bus shelter at the stop, trees along the street leading to the stop, a vertical curb at the stop, the setback of the stop from the street edge, and a continuous sidewalk leading to the stop. Such a survey may help transit planners choose the best transit-stop locations and devote financial resources to the most promising transit-stop amenities, given the inevitable tradeoffs involved.

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