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Using focus groups to investigate issues of red light running Wissinger, Leanne M ; Hummer, Joseph E ; Milazzo, Joseph S II

By: Wissinger, Leanne MContributor(s): Hummer, Joseph E | Milazzo, Joseph S IIPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1734, s. 38-45Subject(s): USA | Junction | Traffic signal | Red light | Offence | Video camera | Automatic | | | 841 | 845Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1734Location: Abstract: Red light running (RLR) has been an important issue among transportation officials seeking to make intersections safer for drivers and pedestrians. Many cities in the United States have started programs aimed at reducing the number of red light violations, and many of these programs include the use of automated enforcement utilizing a camera to record violations. Previous research on such enforcement has quantified the rate of its public acceptance through surveys; however, little research has been performed probing the reactions and concerns of the public toward red light cameras. For this study, focus groups were used to investigate the attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of the public toward RLR and red light cameras. Fifteen focus groups were held throughout North Carolina with representatives from organizations interested in and knowledgeable about traffic safety, traffic engineering, and traffic law enforcement, as well as with people not professionally involved in law enforcement or traffic engineering. Some of the focus group discussions involved such issues as determining an appropriate RLR grace period, developing an educational campaign, addressing financial issues, and determining appropriate penalties for RLR violations. Participants voiced their opinions on both sides of the issues; for instance, many participants said they strongly believed there should be some sort of grace period with automated enforcement, whereas others said they felt a zero-tolerance policy should be used. Also, many participants voiced their unequivocal support for automated enforcement, whereas others expressed concerns.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Red light running (RLR) has been an important issue among transportation officials seeking to make intersections safer for drivers and pedestrians. Many cities in the United States have started programs aimed at reducing the number of red light violations, and many of these programs include the use of automated enforcement utilizing a camera to record violations. Previous research on such enforcement has quantified the rate of its public acceptance through surveys; however, little research has been performed probing the reactions and concerns of the public toward red light cameras. For this study, focus groups were used to investigate the attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions of the public toward RLR and red light cameras. Fifteen focus groups were held throughout North Carolina with representatives from organizations interested in and knowledgeable about traffic safety, traffic engineering, and traffic law enforcement, as well as with people not professionally involved in law enforcement or traffic engineering. Some of the focus group discussions involved such issues as determining an appropriate RLR grace period, developing an educational campaign, addressing financial issues, and determining appropriate penalties for RLR violations. Participants voiced their opinions on both sides of the issues; for instance, many participants said they strongly believed there should be some sort of grace period with automated enforcement, whereas others said they felt a zero-tolerance policy should be used. Also, many participants voiced their unequivocal support for automated enforcement, whereas others expressed concerns.

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