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Field evaluation of a leading pedestrian interval signal phase at three urban intersections Houten, Ron van et al

By: Houten, Ron vanPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1734, s. 86-92Subject(s): USA | Traffic signal | | Junction | Impact study | Pedestrian | Behaviour | | | 22 | 821Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1734Location: Abstract: About 37% of pedestrian injury crashes and 20% of fatal pedestrian crashes occur at intersections. Many conventional countermeasures include traffic control devices that either increase pedestrian attention to potential vehicle-pedestrian conflicts or encourage drivers to yield to pedestrians. A noteworthy limitation of these warning and prompting messages is their reliance on a voluntary behavioral response. Public education and enforcement campaigns have also generally not produced tangible and long-lasting safety benefits. This research, conducted at three urban intersections, examined the influence of a 3-s leading pedestrian interval (LPI)--a brief and exclusive signal phase dedicated to pedestrian traffic--on pedestrian behavior and conflicts with turning vehicles. The introduction of a 3-s LPI reduced conflicts between pedestrians and turning vehicles and reduced the incidence of pedestrians yielding the right-of-way to turning vehicles.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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About 37% of pedestrian injury crashes and 20% of fatal pedestrian crashes occur at intersections. Many conventional countermeasures include traffic control devices that either increase pedestrian attention to potential vehicle-pedestrian conflicts or encourage drivers to yield to pedestrians. A noteworthy limitation of these warning and prompting messages is their reliance on a voluntary behavioral response. Public education and enforcement campaigns have also generally not produced tangible and long-lasting safety benefits. This research, conducted at three urban intersections, examined the influence of a 3-s leading pedestrian interval (LPI)--a brief and exclusive signal phase dedicated to pedestrian traffic--on pedestrian behavior and conflicts with turning vehicles. The introduction of a 3-s LPI reduced conflicts between pedestrians and turning vehicles and reduced the incidence of pedestrians yielding the right-of-way to turning vehicles.

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