The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Transportation, energy, and environmental policy : VIII biennal Asilomar conference redaktör: Sperling, Dan ; redaktör: Kurani, Ken

By: Sperling, Dan [edt]Contributor(s): Kurani, Ken [edt]Publication details: Washington DC Transportation Research Board, TRB, 2001ISBN: 0309085713Subject(s): USA | | Conference | Transport mode | Energy | Environment | Policy | 15 | J11 | Prc | PrdOnline resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: Under the best of conditions, a publication such as this is the work of many people. This book draws on the efforts of many people, over many months. The VIII Biennial Asilomar Conference on Transportation, Energy, and Environmental Policy began on September 11, 2001. We will discuss the circumstances further in the Introduction. Here we simply observe that the conference could not be convened as planned. It required several months to complete in three steps: the first, an abbreviated meeting at Asilomar on September 11 and 12, 2001; then a session at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C. in January 2002 to present several papers originally scheduled for presentation at Asilomar; and, finally, several discussions to develop materials that would eventually be edited into the final chapter of these proceedings. The first step was the conference, hosted and organized by the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis (ITS-Davis). It was held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Monterey, California, under the auspices of the National Research Council’s Transportation Research Board (TRB)—in particular, the Standing Committees on Energy and Alternative Transportation Fuels. Sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Ministry of Natural Resources Canada, ExxonMobil, Chevron, University of California Transportation Center, and Energy Foundation. The core members of the conference steering committee members were Debbie Adler (USEPA), Jack Johnston (ExxonMobil), Paul Leiby (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jason Mark (Union of Concerned Scientists), David Rodgers (USDOE), and Dan Sperling (UC Davis). ITS-Davis staff provided logistical and administrative support and services, under the direction of Shirley Long. The TRB session in Washington, D.C., was chaired by Danilo Santini (Argonne National Laboratory). The final chapter drew on the efforts of the Asilomar Conference attendees and presenters, as well as participants in other “agenda setting” discussions, including a chapter by Martin Lee-Gosselin (Université Laval) and Dan Sperling in TRB’s Special Report 268: Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy, as well as chapters by Kevin Heanue (U.S. Department of Transportation), Dan Sperling (1), David Greene (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), and David Rodgers (USDOE) in another TRB publication, Conference Proceedings 28: Environmental Research Needs in Transportation (2). Each paper published in this volume was peer reviewed by at least two individuals. The peer review process was overseen by the editors and conducted with the cooperation of two TRB committees (the Standing Committee on Transportation Energy and the Standing Committee on Alternative Transportation Fuels). The two committee chairs—Marianne Mintz and Peter Reilly- Roe, respectively—offered invaluable assistance in the organization of the conference and the peer review process. Many individuals participated in the three phases of the expanded “conference.” Under trying circumstances, those at Asilomar on September 11, 2001, convened a day-and-a-half of thoughtful and insightful deliberation on the topic of transitions in transportation energy. Following Dan Sperling’s opening remarks, Peter Brown and Lee Schipper presented papers under the theme of “Motivations and Forces for Change,” both of which appear in this volume. Mike Walsh then chaired a session on “Vehicle Technology and Fuel Options During Transition” that included presentations from Mark Delucchi, Robert Williams, David Greene, and Robert Moore. Chapters by Williams and Greene (see the chapter by Johnson, Greene, and Birky) are included here. The session titled “Lessons Learned, Transition Strategies and Policies” was chaired by Rob Chapman (Rand Corporation). It included presentations by Thomas White (USDOE) and C. J. Brodrick (UC Davis). Chapters based on both are included in this volume. It also included presentations by Robert Knight (Bevilaqua-Knight, Inc), Steve Plotkin (Argonne National Laboratory), David Greene, Tom Cackette (California Air Resources Board), and John DeCicco (Environmental Defense). Other chapters in this book are based on papers presented at the TRB session in January 2002, or otherwise included because they had been solicited for the original conference plan. These include the chapters by Farrell (Carnegie Mellon) et al., Elzen (Twente University) et al., Kågeson (Nature Associates), and Hayashi (Nagoya University) et al. While many people have contributed to this work, we the editors are solely responsible for any errors and omissions. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of any sponsor or supporter of the conference or the production of these proceedings. REFERENCES 1. Special Report 268: Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002. 2. Conference Proceedings 28: Environmental Research Needs in Transportation. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
No physical items for this record

Under the best of conditions, a publication such as this is the work of many people. This book draws on the efforts of many people, over many months. The VIII Biennial Asilomar Conference on Transportation, Energy, and Environmental Policy began on September 11, 2001. We will discuss the circumstances further in the Introduction. Here we simply observe that the conference could not be convened as planned. It required several months to complete in three steps: the first, an abbreviated meeting at Asilomar on September 11 and 12, 2001; then a session at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C. in January 2002 to present several papers originally scheduled for presentation at Asilomar; and, finally, several discussions to develop materials that would eventually be edited into the final chapter of these proceedings. The first step was the conference, hosted and organized by the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis (ITS-Davis). It was held at the Asilomar Conference Center in Monterey, California, under the auspices of the National Research Council’s Transportation Research Board (TRB)—in particular, the Standing Committees on Energy and Alternative Transportation Fuels. Sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Ministry of Natural Resources Canada, ExxonMobil, Chevron, University of California Transportation Center, and Energy Foundation. The core members of the conference steering committee members were Debbie Adler (USEPA), Jack Johnston (ExxonMobil), Paul Leiby (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jason Mark (Union of Concerned Scientists), David Rodgers (USDOE), and Dan Sperling (UC Davis). ITS-Davis staff provided logistical and administrative support and services, under the direction of Shirley Long. The TRB session in Washington, D.C., was chaired by Danilo Santini (Argonne National Laboratory). The final chapter drew on the efforts of the Asilomar Conference attendees and presenters, as well as participants in other “agenda setting” discussions, including a chapter by Martin Lee-Gosselin (Université Laval) and Dan Sperling in TRB’s Special Report 268: Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy, as well as chapters by Kevin Heanue (U.S. Department of Transportation), Dan Sperling (1), David Greene (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), and David Rodgers (USDOE) in another TRB publication, Conference Proceedings 28: Environmental Research Needs in Transportation (2). Each paper published in this volume was peer reviewed by at least two individuals. The peer review process was overseen by the editors and conducted with the cooperation of two TRB committees (the Standing Committee on Transportation Energy and the Standing Committee on Alternative Transportation Fuels). The two committee chairs—Marianne Mintz and Peter Reilly- Roe, respectively—offered invaluable assistance in the organization of the conference and the peer review process. Many individuals participated in the three phases of the expanded “conference.” Under trying circumstances, those at Asilomar on September 11, 2001, convened a day-and-a-half of thoughtful and insightful deliberation on the topic of transitions in transportation energy. Following Dan Sperling’s opening remarks, Peter Brown and Lee Schipper presented papers under the theme of “Motivations and Forces for Change,” both of which appear in this volume. Mike Walsh then chaired a session on “Vehicle Technology and Fuel Options During Transition” that included presentations from Mark Delucchi, Robert Williams, David Greene, and Robert Moore. Chapters by Williams and Greene (see the chapter by Johnson, Greene, and Birky) are included here. The session titled “Lessons Learned, Transition Strategies and Policies” was chaired by Rob Chapman (Rand Corporation). It included presentations by Thomas White (USDOE) and C. J. Brodrick (UC Davis). Chapters based on both are included in this volume. It also included presentations by Robert Knight (Bevilaqua-Knight, Inc), Steve Plotkin (Argonne National Laboratory), David Greene, Tom Cackette (California Air Resources Board), and John DeCicco (Environmental Defense). Other chapters in this book are based on papers presented at the TRB session in January 2002, or otherwise included because they had been solicited for the original conference plan. These include the chapters by Farrell (Carnegie Mellon) et al., Elzen (Twente University) et al., Kågeson (Nature Associates), and Hayashi (Nagoya University) et al. While many people have contributed to this work, we the editors are solely responsible for any errors and omissions. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of any sponsor or supporter of the conference or the production of these proceedings. REFERENCES 1. Special Report 268: Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002. 2. Conference Proceedings 28: Environmental Research Needs in Transportation. TRB, National Research Council, Washington, D.C., 2002.

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