The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Articulated truck crashes : Fatal crashes involving articulated trucks

By: Australian Transport Safety Bureau, ATSBContributor(s): Monograph 8Publication details: Canberra Australian Transport Safety Bureau, ATSB, 2001; Monograph 8, Description: 4 sSubject(s): Australia | Articulated vehicle | Accident rate | Fatality | Collision | Characteristics | | Statistics | 811Online resources: Publikation/Publication Abstract: The number of fatalities and fatal crashes involving articulated trucks peaked in the late 1980s. From 1989 to 1991 there was a substantial decrease in the number of crashes and fatalities. Since 1997 (to 2000) the number of crashes and fatalities has increased each year. The level of activity in the road transport industry, measured by distance travelled and freight carried per kilometre have continued to increase in recent years. The fatality rate per distance travelled, while showing improvements in truck safety in the early 1990s, increased between 1999 and 2000. The most recent data available indicates that in multi-vehicle crashes, the driver of the articulated truck is generally not the party responsible for the crash.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The number of fatalities and fatal crashes involving articulated trucks peaked in the late 1980s. From 1989 to 1991 there was a substantial decrease in the number of crashes and fatalities. Since 1997 (to 2000) the number of crashes and fatalities has increased each year. The level of activity in the road transport industry, measured by distance travelled and freight carried per kilometre have continued to increase in recent years. The fatality rate per distance travelled, while showing improvements in truck safety in the early 1990s, increased between 1999 and 2000. The most recent data available indicates that in multi-vehicle crashes, the driver of the articulated truck is generally not the party responsible for the crash.

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