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Solution for distressed pavements and crack reflection Brown, Norman R Skip

By: Brown, Norman R SkipPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: nr 1819, s. 313-7Subject(s): USA | Conference | | Cracking | Reflection | Repair | Method | Subgrade | | Drying | Deflection | Minimum | Flexibility | Surfacing | 70Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: It is commonly accepted that cracks in aged asphalt pavements will reflect through seal coat and overlay applications. Pavement fabric placed under asphalt concrete overlays will slow this crack reflection, but not stop it. Nineteen years of experience working with the same fabric under a double chip seal has shown that using a modified technique, developed through trial and experimentation, adds substantial pavement life at a reduced cost over typical methods of repair used in the industry. In addition, pavement deterioration due to oxidation and stripping has been eliminated because air and water are unable to penetrate the surface. The subgrade dries out and regains its original strength, minimizing deflection under traffic loadings. This method reduces crack reflection by more than 90% over alternate methods. The reduction is due mainly to a regaining of the subgrade strength along with an increase in the flexibility of the surface through the use of a higher percentage of oil in the total mix. The most surprising aspect of this process is that alligatored pavement can be repaired without having to remove and replace the damaged pavement.
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It is commonly accepted that cracks in aged asphalt pavements will reflect through seal coat and overlay applications. Pavement fabric placed under asphalt concrete overlays will slow this crack reflection, but not stop it. Nineteen years of experience working with the same fabric under a double chip seal has shown that using a modified technique, developed through trial and experimentation, adds substantial pavement life at a reduced cost over typical methods of repair used in the industry. In addition, pavement deterioration due to oxidation and stripping has been eliminated because air and water are unable to penetrate the surface. The subgrade dries out and regains its original strength, minimizing deflection under traffic loadings. This method reduces crack reflection by more than 90% over alternate methods. The reduction is due mainly to a regaining of the subgrade strength along with an increase in the flexibility of the surface through the use of a higher percentage of oil in the total mix. The most surprising aspect of this process is that alligatored pavement can be repaired without having to remove and replace the damaged pavement.

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