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Laboratory and field evaluation of cement kiln dust and lime for stabilizing clayey silt on low-volume unpaved roads Legere, Glen ; Tremblay, Helene

By: Legere, GlenContributor(s): Tremblay, HelenePublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: nr 1819, s. 3-10Subject(s): USA | Conference | Low traffic road | Unsurfaced road | Soil stabilization | Cement | Dust | Lime | Clay | Silt | Cohesive soil | Test | Variability | Mix design | Compression | | 62Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: The potential of cement kiln dust (CKD) and lime (quicklime) for stabilizing low-volume unpaved roads on sites dominated by cohesive soils was investigated. CKD, lime plus CKD, lime, and portland cement were tested at different mixtures and soil moisture contents in a clayey silt to determine the resulting unconfined compressive strength after three curing periods. In a field study, road sections were stabilized with CKD and with lime plus CKD, and then a gravel running surface was added. Soil penetration resistance increased after the treatment. Field results confirmed the laboratory results and helped identify the most effective treatment. Stabilization proved cost-effective for new roads in areas where gravel is difficult to obtain.
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The potential of cement kiln dust (CKD) and lime (quicklime) for stabilizing low-volume unpaved roads on sites dominated by cohesive soils was investigated. CKD, lime plus CKD, lime, and portland cement were tested at different mixtures and soil moisture contents in a clayey silt to determine the resulting unconfined compressive strength after three curing periods. In a field study, road sections were stabilized with CKD and with lime plus CKD, and then a gravel running surface was added. Soil penetration resistance increased after the treatment. Field results confirmed the laboratory results and helped identify the most effective treatment. Stabilization proved cost-effective for new roads in areas where gravel is difficult to obtain.

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