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Stabilizing unpaved roads with calcium chloride Monlux, Stephen

By: Publication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: 1819, s. 52-6Subject(s): Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service has stabilized unpaved road surfacing materials with relatively high concentrations of calcium chloride salt. The percentage of calcium chloride is higher than that traditionally used for dust abatement or aggregate base stabilization. Up to 2% pure salt by weight of aggregate was mixed into the top 2 in. (50 mm) of both aggregate and native road surfaces. The results were monitored for 2 to 4 years. The stabilized road surfaces resisted raveling and washboarding for several seasons and significantly reduced road blading and aggregate loss. As a result, calcium chloride stabilization may be a cost-effective treatment for roads with daily traffic volumes less than 200. Other benefits include reduced surface erosion and sedimentation; improved safety from reduced dust, raveling, and washboarding; and less frost penetration. Encouraged by these results, the Forest Service is conducting additional evaluations to determine the cost-effectiveness of surface stabilization with both magnesium chloride and calcium chloride in different environments and with different aggregate materials.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service has stabilized unpaved road surfacing materials with relatively high concentrations of calcium chloride salt. The percentage of calcium chloride is higher than that traditionally used for dust abatement or aggregate base stabilization. Up to 2% pure salt by weight of aggregate was mixed into the top 2 in. (50 mm) of both aggregate and native road surfaces. The results were monitored for 2 to 4 years. The stabilized road surfaces resisted raveling and washboarding for several seasons and significantly reduced road blading and aggregate loss. As a result, calcium chloride stabilization may be a cost-effective treatment for roads with daily traffic volumes less than 200. Other benefits include reduced surface erosion and sedimentation; improved safety from reduced dust, raveling, and washboarding; and less frost penetration. Encouraged by these results, the Forest Service is conducting additional evaluations to determine the cost-effectiveness of surface stabilization with both magnesium chloride and calcium chloride in different environments and with different aggregate materials.

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