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Locally available aggregate and sediment production Foltz, Randy B ; Truebe, Mark

By: Foltz, Randy BContributor(s): Truebe, MarkPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: 1819, s. 185-93Subject(s): USA | Conference | Sedimentation | Impact study | Variability | Aggregate | Test | Accuracy | Prediction | Erosion | Surfacing | Quality | Run off | 56Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: Selection of suitable locally available materials to build strong and durable roads with aggregate surfaces is desired to minimize road construction and maintenance costs and to minimize the detrimental effects of sedimentation. Eighteen aggregates were selected from local sources in Idaho, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington State. Aggregate was placed in shallow metal frames and compacted to simulate a forest road. The levels of runoff and sediment from a high-intensity, long-duration simulated rainstorm were measured. The material tests selected for use in the study included ones that define the basic characteristics of the aggregate, along with a number of tests intended to predict susceptibility to erosion. Each of the tests was statistically evaluated to identify those that best predicted the perceived aggregate quality. The two best indicators of aggregate quality were the results of the sand equivalent test and the P20 portion of the Oregon air degradation test. The best indicator of either runoff or sediment production was the fraction passing the 0.6-mm sieve. Acceptable aggregates, both those of good quality and those of marginal quality, exhibited a 2-order-of-magnitude range in both runoff and sediment production.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Selection of suitable locally available materials to build strong and durable roads with aggregate surfaces is desired to minimize road construction and maintenance costs and to minimize the detrimental effects of sedimentation. Eighteen aggregates were selected from local sources in Idaho, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington State. Aggregate was placed in shallow metal frames and compacted to simulate a forest road. The levels of runoff and sediment from a high-intensity, long-duration simulated rainstorm were measured. The material tests selected for use in the study included ones that define the basic characteristics of the aggregate, along with a number of tests intended to predict susceptibility to erosion. Each of the tests was statistically evaluated to identify those that best predicted the perceived aggregate quality. The two best indicators of aggregate quality were the results of the sand equivalent test and the P20 portion of the Oregon air degradation test. The best indicator of either runoff or sediment production was the fraction passing the 0.6-mm sieve. Acceptable aggregates, both those of good quality and those of marginal quality, exhibited a 2-order-of-magnitude range in both runoff and sediment production.

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