The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Definition of the light vehicle off-roadway crash problem for the intelligent vehicle initiative Najm, Wassim G ; Schimek, Paul M ; Smith, David L

By: Najm, Wassim GContributor(s): Schimek, Paul M | Smith, David LPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2001Description: nr 1759, s. 28-37Subject(s): USA | Car | Delivery vehicle | | Data base | Accident | | Cause | 812Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1759Location: Abstract: Off-roadway crashes involving light vehicles (passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, vans, and pickup trucks) were analyzed based on the 1998 National Automotive Sampling System/General Estimates System crash database to support the development of countermeasure systems as part of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Intelligent Vehicle Initiative. An off-roadway crash occurs when a vehicle in transport departs the road due to loss of control or crossing the edge of the roadway. Approximately 924,000 such crashes occurred in the United States in 1998. These crashes are grouped into six distinct precrash scenarios (3 x 2 matrix) based on vehicle movements (going straight, negotiating a curve, or initiating a maneuver) and critical events (departed roadway edge or lost control). These scenarios are described statistically in terms of their physical setting, which consists of the roadway type, land use, relation to junction, number of travel lanes, and speed limit. Moreover, factors that might have contributed to the cause of these crashes are identified. According to this analysis, 85% of these off-roadway crashes occurred on nonfreeways, 64% in rural areas, 83% away from junctions, 60% on two lanes of travel, and 62% below the 89-km/h (55-mph) speed limit. In addition, speeding and alcohol were reported in 25% and 20% of these crashes, respectively. Finally, inclement environmental conditions or driver inattention or distraction might have contributed to about 42% of these crashes.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut

VTI:s bibliotek i Linköping
bibliotek@vti.se

Available

Off-roadway crashes involving light vehicles (passenger cars, sport utility vehicles, vans, and pickup trucks) were analyzed based on the 1998 National Automotive Sampling System/General Estimates System crash database to support the development of countermeasure systems as part of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Intelligent Vehicle Initiative. An off-roadway crash occurs when a vehicle in transport departs the road due to loss of control or crossing the edge of the roadway. Approximately 924,000 such crashes occurred in the United States in 1998. These crashes are grouped into six distinct precrash scenarios (3 x 2 matrix) based on vehicle movements (going straight, negotiating a curve, or initiating a maneuver) and critical events (departed roadway edge or lost control). These scenarios are described statistically in terms of their physical setting, which consists of the roadway type, land use, relation to junction, number of travel lanes, and speed limit. Moreover, factors that might have contributed to the cause of these crashes are identified. According to this analysis, 85% of these off-roadway crashes occurred on nonfreeways, 64% in rural areas, 83% away from junctions, 60% on two lanes of travel, and 62% below the 89-km/h (55-mph) speed limit. In addition, speeding and alcohol were reported in 25% and 20% of these crashes, respectively. Finally, inclement environmental conditions or driver inattention or distraction might have contributed to about 42% of these crashes.

Powered by Koha