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Computational techniques used in the driver performance model of the interactive highway safety design model Levison, William H et al

By: Levison, William HPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2001Description: 1779, s. 17-25Subject(s): USA | Highway design | | Computer aided design | Driver | Behaviour | Mathematical model | Perception | Speed | Choice | | | 841Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1779Location: Abstract: The Interactive Highway Safety Design Model (IHSDM) is a high-priority research area for the Federal Highway Administration. IHSDM is a software system for evaluating the safety of alternative highway designs in a computer-aided design environment. The initial phase of this research program is to develop IHSDM for use in the design of two-lane rural highways. IHSDM includes a driver-vehicle module that simulates the moment-to-moment actions of a single driver-vehicle unit. Reviewed are the computational approaches that have guided the implementation of the driver performance model (DPM) that along with a vehicle model and other components constitute the driver-vehicle module. Five major computational functions of DPM are reviewed: perception, speed decision, path decision, speed control, and path control. Comparison of model results with data from a driving simulator demonstrates the ability of DPM to account for the horizontal curve deflection angle on the speed profile.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The Interactive Highway Safety Design Model (IHSDM) is a high-priority research area for the Federal Highway Administration. IHSDM is a software system for evaluating the safety of alternative highway designs in a computer-aided design environment. The initial phase of this research program is to develop IHSDM for use in the design of two-lane rural highways. IHSDM includes a driver-vehicle module that simulates the moment-to-moment actions of a single driver-vehicle unit. Reviewed are the computational approaches that have guided the implementation of the driver performance model (DPM) that along with a vehicle model and other components constitute the driver-vehicle module. Five major computational functions of DPM are reviewed: perception, speed decision, path decision, speed control, and path control. Comparison of model results with data from a driving simulator demonstrates the ability of DPM to account for the horizontal curve deflection angle on the speed profile.

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