The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Progress in wheelchair securement : Ten years after the Americans with disabilities act Hunter-Zaworski, KM ; Zaworski, JR

By: Hunter-Zaworski, KMContributor(s): Zaworski, JRPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2001Description: nr 1779, s. 197-202Subject(s): USA | Disabled person | Wheelchair | Public transport | Safety | Movement | Prevention | Technology | 111 | 913Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1779Location: Abstract: Wheelchair securement is an issue in public transit that should have been resolved in the first few years after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ADA requires that wheelchairs be secured so that they will not move more than 50 mm (2 in.) in any direction, even during a crash of the transporting vehicle. This requirement is of great interest to the existing securement industry and to wheelchair manufacturers. The former are interested because of the potential market for securement systems, and the latter because of the liability associated with use of their wheelchairs on public transit. In the 10 years since the ADA became law, some major advances have been made in securement technology. Unfortunately, current securement systems are essentially the same as those in use before ADA because work on standards for securement has been slow. Background on securement is presented, and work done on securement in the last decade is reviewed. The current status of wheelchair securement in public transit is discussed, particularly in the area of standards. Recommendations for speeding the acceptance of advanced securement technologies are made.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Wheelchair securement is an issue in public transit that should have been resolved in the first few years after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ADA requires that wheelchairs be secured so that they will not move more than 50 mm (2 in.) in any direction, even during a crash of the transporting vehicle. This requirement is of great interest to the existing securement industry and to wheelchair manufacturers. The former are interested because of the potential market for securement systems, and the latter because of the liability associated with use of their wheelchairs on public transit. In the 10 years since the ADA became law, some major advances have been made in securement technology. Unfortunately, current securement systems are essentially the same as those in use before ADA because work on standards for securement has been slow. Background on securement is presented, and work done on securement in the last decade is reviewed. The current status of wheelchair securement in public transit is discussed, particularly in the area of standards. Recommendations for speeding the acceptance of advanced securement technologies are made.

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