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Using global positioning system data to understand variations in path choice Jan, Oliver ; Horowitz, Alan J ; Peng, Zhong-Ren

By: Jan, OliverContributor(s): Horowitz, Alan J | Peng, Zhong-RenPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1725, s. 37-44Subject(s): USA | GPS | | Selection | Traffic assignment | | Variability | Vehicle | Location | Household | Origin destination traffic | Data acquisition | 11Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1725Location: Abstract: A comprehensive set of Global Positioning System (GPS) vehicle location data from Lexington, Kentucky, households was analyzed to determine if such data can be helpful in improving path choice assumptions in traffic assignment models. The portion of the data used consisted primarily of a reconstruction of the street network and the lists of street segments in each path. Analysis was based on matches of trips (e.g., pairs of trips with similar origins and destinations). Matches were obtained for trips within households and for trips across households. Statistics used to compare trips in matches were a path deviation index and the percentage of identical links. It was found that the path chosen on a trip was quite sensitive to the location of the origin and destination and that the chosen path most often differed considerably from the shortest time path across the network. Paths for trips made by the same driver were very consistent over time; paths by different drivers showed more deviations even when the trip ends were the same or very similar. As a result of this research, recommendations are made as to how GPS data on path choice can be better collected in the future for improvement of traffic assignment models.
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A comprehensive set of Global Positioning System (GPS) vehicle location data from Lexington, Kentucky, households was analyzed to determine if such data can be helpful in improving path choice assumptions in traffic assignment models. The portion of the data used consisted primarily of a reconstruction of the street network and the lists of street segments in each path. Analysis was based on matches of trips (e.g., pairs of trips with similar origins and destinations). Matches were obtained for trips within households and for trips across households. Statistics used to compare trips in matches were a path deviation index and the percentage of identical links. It was found that the path chosen on a trip was quite sensitive to the location of the origin and destination and that the chosen path most often differed considerably from the shortest time path across the network. Paths for trips made by the same driver were very consistent over time; paths by different drivers showed more deviations even when the trip ends were the same or very similar. As a result of this research, recommendations are made as to how GPS data on path choice can be better collected in the future for improvement of traffic assignment models.

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