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Laboratory performance evaluation of cement-stabilized soil base mixtures Mohammad, Louay N ; Raghavandra, Amar ; Huang, Baoshan

By: Mohammad, Louay NContributor(s): Raghavandra, Amar | Huang, BaoshanPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1721, s. 19-28Subject(s): USA | Soil stabilization | Cement | Soil | Mix design | Experimental road | | Tension | Compression | Modulus of elasticity | Fibre | | Compaction | | 53Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1721Location: Abstract: In-place cement-stabilized soils have served as the primary base material for the majority of noninterstate flexible pavements in Louisiana for many years. These materials are economically and easily constructed and provide outstanding structural characteristics for flexible pavements. However, these cement-treated materials crack due to shrinkage, with the cracks reflecting from the base to the surface. A laboratory study examined the performance of four different cement-stabilized soil mixtures recently used in the construction of test lanes at the Louisiana Pavement Testing Facilities. Laboratory tests included the indirect tensile strength and strain, unconfined compressive strength, and indirect tensile resilient modulus tests. The four mixtures were (a) in-place-mixed cement-treated soil with 10% cement, (b) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 10% cement, (c) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 4% cement, and (d) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 4% cement and fiber reinforcement. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in performance between the plant-mixed and in-place-mixed cement-treated soil mixtures. The inclusion of fiber to the cement-treated soil mixture significantly increased the indirect tensile strain and the toughness index. Increases in compaction effort maintained or significantly increased the indirect tensile strength and unconfined compressive strength. Increases in curing period maintained or significantly increased indirect tensile and unconfined compressive strength as well as the resilient modulus of the mixtures.
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In-place cement-stabilized soils have served as the primary base material for the majority of noninterstate flexible pavements in Louisiana for many years. These materials are economically and easily constructed and provide outstanding structural characteristics for flexible pavements. However, these cement-treated materials crack due to shrinkage, with the cracks reflecting from the base to the surface. A laboratory study examined the performance of four different cement-stabilized soil mixtures recently used in the construction of test lanes at the Louisiana Pavement Testing Facilities. Laboratory tests included the indirect tensile strength and strain, unconfined compressive strength, and indirect tensile resilient modulus tests. The four mixtures were (a) in-place-mixed cement-treated soil with 10% cement, (b) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 10% cement, (c) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 4% cement, and (d) plant-mixed cement-treated soil with 4% cement and fiber reinforcement. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in performance between the plant-mixed and in-place-mixed cement-treated soil mixtures. The inclusion of fiber to the cement-treated soil mixture significantly increased the indirect tensile strain and the toughness index. Increases in compaction effort maintained or significantly increased the indirect tensile strength and unconfined compressive strength. Increases in curing period maintained or significantly increased indirect tensile and unconfined compressive strength as well as the resilient modulus of the mixtures.

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