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Real-time indicators of vehicle kilometers of travel and congestion : One year of experience Hwang, Ho-Ling et al

By: Hwang, Ho-LingPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1719, s. 209-14Subject(s): USA | Data acquisition | Internet | Traffic | Data processing | Delay | | Vehicle kilometer | 21Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1719Location: Abstract: Automated traffic data posted on the Internet by four cities have been continuously downloaded, processed, and archived for more than 1 year by an automated system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Although the experimental system is far from national in scale and scope, it has shown that automated collection and processing of local traffic data via the Internet for national purposes is feasible and practical. Strong seasonal patterns make it too early to estimate statistical models of traffic growth, but comparisons of the same months in 1998 and 1999 indicate changes ranging from 1% to 3% for the monitored systems. Direct measurements of delay on the monitored systems are lower than published estimates for previous years. Although some progress in the input of missing data has been made, missing data are still a major problem, and better methods are needed.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Automated traffic data posted on the Internet by four cities have been continuously downloaded, processed, and archived for more than 1 year by an automated system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Although the experimental system is far from national in scale and scope, it has shown that automated collection and processing of local traffic data via the Internet for national purposes is feasible and practical. Strong seasonal patterns make it too early to estimate statistical models of traffic growth, but comparisons of the same months in 1998 and 1999 indicate changes ranging from 1% to 3% for the monitored systems. Direct measurements of delay on the monitored systems are lower than published estimates for previous years. Although some progress in the input of missing data has been made, missing data are still a major problem, and better methods are needed.

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