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Effects of innovative pedestrian signs at unsignalized locations : Three treatments Huang, Herman ; Zegeer, Charles ; Nassi, Richard

By: Huang, HermanContributor(s): Zegeer, Charles | Nassi, RichardPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1705, s. 43-52Subject(s): USA | Uncontrolled junction | Pedestrian | Traffic sign | Variability | Test | Pedestrian crossing | Behaviour | Driver | Impact study | | 22Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1705Location: Abstract: Three types of devices that have been used in conjunction with marked crosswalks in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety were evaluated: an overhead crosswalk sign in Seattle, Washington; pedestrian safety cones (which read, "State Law: Yield to Pedestrians in Crosswalk in Your Half of Road") in New York State and in Portland, Oregon; and pedestrian-activated overhead signs (which read, "Stop for Pedestrians in Crosswalk") in Tucson, Arizona. The signs were used under varying traffic and roadway conditions. The effects of these three treatments on pedestrian and motorist behavior were evaluated. The variables of interest were whether pedestrians had the benefit of motorists yielding to them; whether pedestrians had to run, hesitate, or abort their crossing; and whether pedestrians crossed in the crosswalk. The New York cones and Seattle signs were effective in increasing the numbers of pedestrians who had the benefit of motorists yielding to them. At one location in Tucson, the overhead sign increased motorist yielding to pedestrians. The signs in Seattle and Tucson were effective in reducing the number of persons who had to run, hesitate, or abort their crossing. None of the treatments had a clear effect on whether people crossed in the crosswalk. By themselves, these devices cannot ensure that motorists will slow down and yield to pedestrians. It is essential to use these and other devices along with education and enforcement, but creation of friendlier pedestrian environments (e.g., by means of implementing geometric improvements) for the purpose of reducing vehicle speeds may be more important.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Three types of devices that have been used in conjunction with marked crosswalks in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety were evaluated: an overhead crosswalk sign in Seattle, Washington; pedestrian safety cones (which read, "State Law: Yield to Pedestrians in Crosswalk in Your Half of Road") in New York State and in Portland, Oregon; and pedestrian-activated overhead signs (which read, "Stop for Pedestrians in Crosswalk") in Tucson, Arizona. The signs were used under varying traffic and roadway conditions. The effects of these three treatments on pedestrian and motorist behavior were evaluated. The variables of interest were whether pedestrians had the benefit of motorists yielding to them; whether pedestrians had to run, hesitate, or abort their crossing; and whether pedestrians crossed in the crosswalk. The New York cones and Seattle signs were effective in increasing the numbers of pedestrians who had the benefit of motorists yielding to them. At one location in Tucson, the overhead sign increased motorist yielding to pedestrians. The signs in Seattle and Tucson were effective in reducing the number of persons who had to run, hesitate, or abort their crossing. None of the treatments had a clear effect on whether people crossed in the crosswalk. By themselves, these devices cannot ensure that motorists will slow down and yield to pedestrians. It is essential to use these and other devices along with education and enforcement, but creation of friendlier pedestrian environments (e.g., by means of implementing geometric improvements) for the purpose of reducing vehicle speeds may be more important.

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