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Coordinating traffic signals for bicycle progression Taylor, Dean B ; Mahmassani, Hani D

By: Taylor, Dean BContributor(s): Mahmassani, Hani DPublication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1705, s. 85-92Subject(s): USA | Traffic signal | Linked signals | Traffic composition | Speed | Variability | 22Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1705Location: Abstract: Traffic signal coordination that provides either (a) progression for bicycles or (b) simultaneous progression for bicycles and automobiles traveling on the same facility is analyzed. A conceptual foundation, consisting of three primary contributions, is developed for analyzing bicycle-automobile mixed-traffic progression along signalized streets. First, the principal considerations for bicycle progression are articulated. Second, several concepts and techniques that provide improved (or alternative) multiobjective solutions are presented and analyzed. Third, a multiobjective formulation framework for solving the mixed-traffic design problem is proposed. This framework formally incorporates the elements that were introduced as part of the first two contributions and provides a method to handle the inherent competing objectives of the situation. Additionally, important practical aspects of designing and implementing bicycle progression systems, such as handling bicycle speed variability and selecting appropriate facilities for initial (or test) projects, are identified and discussed.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Traffic signal coordination that provides either (a) progression for bicycles or (b) simultaneous progression for bicycles and automobiles traveling on the same facility is analyzed. A conceptual foundation, consisting of three primary contributions, is developed for analyzing bicycle-automobile mixed-traffic progression along signalized streets. First, the principal considerations for bicycle progression are articulated. Second, several concepts and techniques that provide improved (or alternative) multiobjective solutions are presented and analyzed. Third, a multiobjective formulation framework for solving the mixed-traffic design problem is proposed. This framework formally incorporates the elements that were introduced as part of the first two contributions and provides a method to handle the inherent competing objectives of the situation. Additionally, important practical aspects of designing and implementing bicycle progression systems, such as handling bicycle speed variability and selecting appropriate facilities for initial (or test) projects, are identified and discussed.

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