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Current practice of portland cement concrete pavement texturing Hoerner, Todd E et al

By: Publication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: nr 1860, s. 178-86Subject(s): Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: The importance of surface texture characteristics to roadway safety was first recognized during the late 1940s and early 1950s when increases in traffic volumes and vehicle speeds resulted in increases in wet-weather crashes and fatalities. As a result, agencies conducted extensive research, including experimental projects around the country, to better understand and improve the surface conditions of portland cement concrete pavement in wet-weather conditions. As new surface-texturing methods were tried and evaluated, pavement engineers recognized that a general trade-off existed between friction and noise; that is, surface textures with higher friction tended to produce greater tire-pavement noise. Although considerable information exists on the influence of surface friction characteristics on safety and tire-pavement noise, it is dispersed among numerous sources. An effort is made to identify and summarize key texture-related information and recommendations based on the current state of the practice. Specifically, pavement texture nomenclature is introduced, methods of measuring and quantifying texture are discussed, traditional and innovative texturing methods and techniques are described, respective conclusions pertaining to the influence of texture characteristics on surface friction and tire-pavement noise are summarized, and current state-of-the-art texture-related recommendations are provided.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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The importance of surface texture characteristics to roadway safety was first recognized during the late 1940s and early 1950s when increases in traffic volumes and vehicle speeds resulted in increases in wet-weather crashes and fatalities. As a result, agencies conducted extensive research, including experimental projects around the country, to better understand and improve the surface conditions of portland cement concrete pavement in wet-weather conditions. As new surface-texturing methods were tried and evaluated, pavement engineers recognized that a general trade-off existed between friction and noise; that is, surface textures with higher friction tended to produce greater tire-pavement noise. Although considerable information exists on the influence of surface friction characteristics on safety and tire-pavement noise, it is dispersed among numerous sources. An effort is made to identify and summarize key texture-related information and recommendations based on the current state of the practice. Specifically, pavement texture nomenclature is introduced, methods of measuring and quantifying texture are discussed, traditional and innovative texturing methods and techniques are described, respective conclusions pertaining to the influence of texture characteristics on surface friction and tire-pavement noise are summarized, and current state-of-the-art texture-related recommendations are provided.

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